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I have some code here

   private void Run()
    {
        MyClass c = new MyClass();
        c.Load(somepath1);
        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(filepath))
        {
            string line = string.Empty;
            while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                using (Bitmap B = new Bitmap(line))
                {
                    Point p = SomeMethod(ref c, new Point());
                    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
                    {
                        B.Save(ms, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Bmp);
                        using (Bitmap T = new Bitmap(new Bitmap(Image.FromStream(ms))))
                        using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(T))
                        {
                            g.DrawEllipse(new Pen(Brushes.Red, 4), p.X - 5, p.Y - 5, 10, 10);
                            FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(somepath2);
                            T.Save(Path.Combine(somepath3, fi.Name));
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    } 

and the Function SomeMethod is:

    Point SomeMethod(ref MyClass c, Point mid)
    {
        float[] Mat = new float[9];
        Point p;

        c.Method1(Mat);
        c.Method2(Mat, out p);

        return p;
    }

MyClass is :

public class MyClass
{
    public void Method1(float[] Mat, out Point point)
    {
        //calculation point from values in Mat
    }

    public void Method2(float[] Mat)
    {
        //Do some Operation in Mat
    }

    public void Load(string FileName)
    {
        //Do Some Data Loading From a small file about 400 byte
    }
}

StreamReader sr Opens a file in filepath that has about 400 line of image locations, I read them and draw something on them base on my calculations, I have not used any external library or any unsafe code. the question is why I run out of memory ??

-------------EDIT--------------------

when the program starts it uses about 20mb of memory, after calling Run the memory usage start increasing, if I run it for about 200 images the memory goes around 1.7Gb and Run function finished the work and memory usage get back to 20mb

------------EDIT------------ saving Bitmap B in MemoryStream is becuase graphic can not use Indexed pixel format images. The main question is what is garbage collector doing here?? I have no objects that should remained in memory.

----------EDIT----------------

the exception is :

System.OutOfMemoryException was unhandled
  Message=Out of memory.
  Source=System.Drawing
  StackTrace:
       at System.Drawing.Graphics.CheckErrorStatus(Int32 status)
       at System.Drawing.Graphics.DrawImage(Image image, Int32 x, Int32 y, Int32 width, Int32 height)
       at System.Drawing.Bitmap..ctor(Image original, Int32 width, Int32 height)
       at System.Drawing.Bitmap..ctor(Image original)
       at WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1.buttonrun1_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e) in C:\Users\hamidp\Desktop\WindowsFormsApplication1\WindowsFormsApplication1\Form1.cs:line 115
       at System.Windows.Forms.Control.OnClick(EventArgs e)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Button.OnClick(EventArgs e)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Button.OnMouseUp(MouseEventArgs mevent)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Control.WmMouseUp(Message& m, MouseButtons button, Int32 clicks)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Control.WndProc(Message& m)
       at System.Windows.Forms.ButtonBase.WndProc(Message& m)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Button.WndProc(Message& m)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Control.ControlNativeWindow.OnMessage(Message& m)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Control.ControlNativeWindow.WndProc(Message& m)
       at System.Windows.Forms.NativeWindow.DebuggableCallback(IntPtr hWnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wparam, IntPtr lparam)
       at System.Windows.Forms.UnsafeNativeMethods.DispatchMessageW(MSG& msg)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Application.ComponentManager.System.Windows.Forms.UnsafeNativeMethods.IMsoComponentManager.FPushMessageLoop(Int32 dwComponentID, Int32 reason, Int32 pvLoopData)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Application.ThreadContext.RunMessageLoopInner(Int32 reason, ApplicationContext context)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Application.ThreadContext.RunMessageLoop(Int32 reason, ApplicationContext context)
       at System.Windows.Forms.Application.Run(Form mainForm)
       at WindowsFormsApplication1.Program.Main() in C:\Users\hamidp\Desktop\WindowsFormsApplication1\WindowsFormsApplication1\Program.cs:line 17
       at System.AppDomain._nExecuteAssembly(Assembly assembly, String[] args)
       at System.AppDomain.ExecuteAssembly(String assemblyFile, Evidence assemblySecurity, String[] args)
       at Microsoft.VisualStudio.HostingProcess.HostProc.RunUsersAssembly()
       at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart_Context(Object state)
       at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
       at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart()
  InnerException: 

and the exception thrown at line :

using (Bitmap T = new Bitmap(new Bitmap(Image.FromStream(ms))))

-------------------EDIT-----------------------

I also add the line GC.Collect(); after

while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null)

the same error happened again.

share|improve this question
5  
What size are your images? What OS are you using (32/64 bit)? What platform are you compiling for? –  Oded Dec 7 '10 at 18:06
    
Windows 7 Professional 64 bit, Images are about 350KB jpeg, using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, WinForms. –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:08
    
Try to run this on a smaller subset, while watching memory consumption at the same time. Does it bomb exponentially, or is there a pain threshold? –  Hamish Grubijan Dec 7 '10 at 18:08
    
It increases somehow linear and when it is around 2GB I run out of memory –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:10
2  
JPEG is a compressed format. When it is loaded into memory into a Bitmap, it will be decompressed to full size. A 350K JPEG could expand to a 1MB to 10MB bitmap in memory, depending on the complexity of the image. The pixel width and height of the image will tell you how much memory each image will require in memory (w * h * 4 bytes if 32 bits per pixel) –  dthorpe Dec 7 '10 at 18:24

6 Answers 6

Most likely becase you allocate a lot of objects that you don't dispose.

In this line:

using (Bitmap T = new Bitmap(new Bitmap(Image.FromStream(ms))))

The FromStream call allocates a bitmap that you never dispose. The inner Bitmap constructor creates another bitmap that you never dispose. It's only the outer Bitmap that is disposed.

Remember that the using block only disposes the objects that you allocate directly in that statement, not any object that you create and use as parameters for creating that object.

I don't see the logic in creating a bitmap from a bitmap from a bitmap, when you can just use the bitmap that you have loaded:

using (Bitmap T = (Bitmap)Image.FromStream(ms))

In this line:

g.DrawEllipse(new Pen(Brushes.Red, 4), p.X - 5, p.Y - 5, 10, 10);

you create a Pen object that is never disposed. Put that in a using block:

Using (Pen red = new Pen(Brushes.Red, 4)) {
  g.DrawEllipse(red, p.X - 5, p.Y - 5, 10, 10);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This shouldn't be relevant, though. The objects are quickly unreachable, and the garbage collector should be able to pick them up, the finalizer disposes them, and then they're thrown out on the next garbage collector sweep (finalizing objects can't be swept immediately). I'm not seeing why this would leave 2GB of uncollectable resources. –  Adam Norberg Dec 7 '10 at 18:16
1  
so what is .net garbage collector doing? –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:16
5  
@Adam Norberg: The garbage collector can't remove any undisposed object before it's finalizer has run, and there is only one background thread that runs all finalizers one at a time. If it can't execute the finalizers at the same rate that images are created, the memory will fill up. –  Guffa Dec 7 '10 at 18:21
    
@HPT: The garbage collector removes managed objects that are no longer used, and disposable objects that has been disposed. If you miss to dispose a disposable object, the garbage collector has to run it's finalizer as a backup measure to clean up the resources, which is a lot less effective way of cleaning up the objects. –  Guffa Dec 7 '10 at 18:24
1  
@HPT: When objects are no longed used they can be collected, but that doesn't mean that the GC removes each object instantly. Objects remain in memory until they are collected, which often is at the next collection. Disposable objects contains unmanaged resources, so they have to be disposed before they can be collected. You have to call the Dispose method (or use a using block) on disposable objects so that the garbage collector can remove them. If you don't, the garbage collector gives them to the finalzier thread, so they will be in use until the finalizer thread can take care of them. –  Guffa Dec 7 '10 at 18:58

Sounds like you are compiling or running your application to be 32bit or using ANY CPU.

Compile it to be 64bit and you will not run into the 2GB process limit of 32bit applications.

share|improve this answer
    
no I compile it to target 64bit platform. –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:12
    
@HPT - are you certain you are running is as 64bit? Visual Studio is a 32bit app and using it as a runner (ie. during debug) will run your app as 32bit. –  Oded Dec 7 '10 at 18:16
    
I know, even in debug time or even if i run release version same problem occurs. –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:18
    
@all:see edits please –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:36

You are most likely running out of memory due all the images.

I have a little screen capture application that I've been playing with and when only doing 100 images it takes 2gb+ of memory (physical + page file).

Try scaling it down to see what happens when you only do 10 images.

share|improve this answer
    
when the program starts it uses about 20mb of memory, after calling Run the memory usage start increasing, if I run it for about 200 images the memory goes around 1.7Gb and Run function finished the work and memory usage get back to 20mb. –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:14
1  
That's the same behavior that I have been seeing. –  Tony Abrams Dec 7 '10 at 18:19
    
@all:see edits please –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:35

Your code makes and keeps at least 4 copies of the bitmap in memory at the same time. Bitmap B, the memory stream, possibly two copies for bitmap T, and possibly another for Graphics g. How big are these bitmaps?

You don't really need Bitmap B in memory after the B.Save, but it will remain in memory until the end of the using clause that constructs it. You should consider reordering your code so that objects are released as soon as they are no longer needed. Namely, move the stuff after B.Save() outside of the B using clause at a minimum.

Saving the bitmap to memory stream seems suspicious too. You load the bitmap from disk into bitmap B, then save B to the memory stream (the call to SomeMethod doesn't modify the bitmap), then load the bitmap from the memory stream. Why? Bitmap T should be identical to Bitmap B.

And whats with the new Bitmap(new Bitmap(Image.FromStream(...)))? That seems pointlessly wasteful of memory.

Try reordering your code something like this (untested):

while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null) 
{ 
    Bitmap T = null;
    try
    {
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream()) 
        try
        { 
            Bitmap B = new Bitmap(line);
            try
            { 
                Point p = SomeMethod(ref c, new Point()); 
                B.Save(ms, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Bmp);
            }
            finally 
            {
                B.Dispose();
            }

            T = new Bitmap(Image.FromStream(ms));
        }
        finally
        {
            m.Dispose();
        }

        using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(T)) 
        { 
            g.DrawEllipse(new Pen(Brushes.Red, 4), p.X - 5, p.Y - 5, 10, 10); 
            FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(somepath2); 
            T.Save(Path.Combine(somepath3, fi.Name)); 
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (T != null)
        {
            T.Dispose();
        } 
    }
} 

This arrangement allows objects like Bitmap B and memorystream M to be released as soon as possible. Your nested using statements keep them alive a lot longer than needed, which will prevent the GC from collecting them if the GC were to kick in in the middle of all this. If the GC did kick in in the middle of all this, any objects that could not be collected because they're still referenced by a live variable (or enclosing using clause) will be pushed to the next older heap generation group, which means it will be that much longer before they will be considered for collection again.

Note that Bitmaps also involve unmanaged resources - GDI bitmap handles, which consume system memory outside of the .NET GC system and are not released until Bitmap.Dispose. So even if the bitmap object itself is not collected by the GC, the fact that we are calling Bitmap.Dispose a lot earlier in the execution flow should help reduce memory pressure since that will dispose of the GDI bitmap handle.

I don't think this will solve your memory issue completely, but it should help. When dealing with code that inherently involves large memory consumption, you need to take a more active role in managing when things get allocated and disposed. Using clauses are convenient, but try..finally clauses are more explicit and more precise, IMO.

share|improve this answer
    
see the edits please –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 18:41
1  
Your edits haven't changed anything. Your code still forces 4+ copies of the image to remain in memory for the duration of each loop iteration, and since the garbage collector normally doesn't kick in until the function exits, you're running up a huge memory accumulation in your loop. –  dthorpe Dec 7 '10 at 18:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I just replace GC.Collect() with GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() and the Problem has been solved.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't he call both GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers()? –  froeschli Dec 7 '10 at 19:18
    
-1 You should dispose objects properly instead of waiting for the finalisers to do it. –  Guffa Dec 2 '11 at 4:12
    
+1 This helped me when I needed it. –  Chris Schiffhauer Apr 23 at 0:34

usage of GC.Collect() or GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() is not the correct way of fixing this issue. You are getting this error as you still have Bitmap object. So you have to delete it.

try
{
    IntPtr intPtrHBitmap = IntPtr.Zero; 
    BitmapSource _Source = System.Windows.Interop.Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromHBitmap(intPtrHBitmap, IntPtr.Zero, System.Windows.Int32Rect.Empty, System.Windows.Media.Imaging.BitmapSizeOptions.FromEmptyOptions());
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
}
finally
{
    DeleteObject(intPtrHBitmap);
    _Source = null;
}

Add the following code to the class level without fail.

[System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("gdi32.dll")]
public static extern bool DeleteObject(IntPtr hObject); 
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