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I am starting to play with prolog, and with a Java background it's really difficult for me so here is a silly question:

How will you write an indexOf predicate able to give the index of a given element in a given list ?

My first question is about the predicate arity: I guess it should be 3 such as:

indexOf(List,Element, Index) :- ......

Am I right ? May be this already exists in built-in libraries but I want to learn how to write it. Thanks for your help.

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Looks like a good start. –  aschepler Dec 7 '10 at 20:20
    
@aschepler yes but I am getting crazy to have this little predicate working !!! –  Manuel Selva Dec 7 '10 at 20:39
    
This is indeed a good exercise when learning prolog. FYI: the building predicates to achieve this are nth0 and nth1. (swi-prolog.org/pldoc/…) –  Cephalopod Dec 8 '10 at 15:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can do it recursively: Suppose 0-based index (otherwise just change the 0 with 1 on the first clause)

indexOf([Element|_], Element, 0). % We found the element
indexOf([_|Tail], Element, Index):-
  indexOf(Tail, Element, Index1), % Check in the tail of the list
  Index is Index1+1.  % and increment the resulting index

If you want only to find the first appearance, you could add a cut (!) to avoid backtracking.

indexOf([Element|_], Element, 0):- !.
indexOf([_|Tail], Element, Index):-
  indexOf(Tail, Element, Index1),
  !,
  Index is Index1+1.
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer. Can I replace the first clause with: indexOf([First|_], Element, Index) :- First == Element, Index == 0. ? –  Manuel Selva Dec 7 '10 at 20:34
    
The answer is NO. Can you explain why ? –  Manuel Selva Dec 7 '10 at 20:44
    
The == operator does not perform unification. Thus, it cannot instantiate Index to 0. It can be used, however, in the first comparison (First==Element would be fine because in that predicate both terms should be instantiated). Index==0 will fail when Index is not instantiated. –  gusbro Dec 7 '10 at 23:33
    
Ok thanks for this clear explanation. One more question, I read the = operator can be used for unification. Thus I guess replacing the first clause with: indexOf([First|_], Element, Index) :- First == Element, Index = 0 will work ? Do you confirm ? I am at office, I'll try this at home tonight. –  Manuel Selva Dec 9 '10 at 16:58
    
Yes, it would work. Note that indexOf([First|_], Element, Index):- First == Element, Index = 0. is almost the same as indexOf([First|_], Element, 0):- First == Element. In the latter case the unification is done in the head of the predicate instead of the body. Actually the latter would be the same as indexOf([First|_], Element, Index):- Index = 0, First == Element. so the unification would be performed before the comparison. –  gusbro Dec 9 '10 at 17:11

One should prefer to use tail-recursion:

indexOf(V, [H|T], A, I)
:-
    Value = H, A = I, !
;
    ANew is A + 1,
    indexOf(V, T, ANew, I)
.

indexOf(Value, List, Index)
:-
    indexOf(Value, List, 0, Index)
.

indexOfWithoutFailure(Value, List, Index)
:-
    indexOf(Value, List, 0, Index)
;
    Index = -1
.

Some example queries:

?- indexOf(d, [a, b, c, d, e, f], Index).
Index = 3.

?- indexOf(x, [a, b, c, d, e, f], Index).
false.

?- indexOfWithoutFailure(x, [a, b, c, d, e, f], Index).
Index = -1.

If you want to get all indexes of an element in a list, you should write another predicate for it without the cut named allIndexesOf or something.

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I made this in successor notation and it's quite concise and neat:

index([V|_],V,0).
index([_|T],V,s(I)) :- index(T,V,I).

sample outputs:

?- index([a,b,c,a],a,X).
X = 0 ;
X = s(s(s(0))) ;
false.

?- index(List,a,s(0)).
List = [_G1710, a|_G1714].
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