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i try to write a kind of repository for effective Add,Update, Delete etc. But i am so confused how can i dispose my 2 class ( ErpEntities and DataRepository) there are more advise but also more conflicts on google. i want to make disposing after return value. Shorthly and effectivelly :( Best regards...

namespace WinApp.EF
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void btnSave_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            using (ErpEntities erp = new ErpEntities())
            {
                erp.SaveCustomer(textBox1.Text, textBox2.Text);
            }
        }
    }

    public class ErpEntities : IDisposable
    {

        public int SaveCustomer(string Name, string SurName)
        {
            using (DataRepository<Customer> repository = new DataRepository<Customer>(new TestErpEntities()))
            {
                return repository.Add(new Customer() { Name = Name, SurName = SurName });
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

    }


    public interface IRepository<T> : IDisposable where T : class
    {
         int Add(T entity);
    }

    public class DataRepository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class
    {

        private TestErpEntities _context;

        public DataRepository()
        {
        }   

       public DataRepository(TestErpEntities context)
        {
            _context = context;
        }

        public int Add(T entity)
        {
            _context.AddObject(typeof(T).Name, entity);
            int saveValue = _context.SaveChanges();
            return saveValue;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if (_context != null)
                _context.Dispose();
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Take a look this article. It might help: bit.ly/bF7jL3. –  Steven Dec 7 '10 at 20:23
    
why make life difficult? use a DI container and let it dispose of the context for you. –  RPM1984 Dec 7 '10 at 21:03
    
what is DI container ? –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 21:09
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this is what you want:

public class ErpEntities : IDisposable 
{ 

    public int SaveCustomer(string Name, string SurName) 
    {
        using(DataRepository repository = new DataRepository<Customer>(new TestErpEntities()))
        { 
           return repository.Add(new Customer() { Name = Name, SurName = SurName });  
        } // This using statment ensures that the DataRepository is Dispose()'d when the method exits
    } 


    #region IDisposable Members 

    public void Dispose() 
    { 
       // You could eliminate this as there's nothing in your 
       // ErpEntities class that needs disposing
    } 

    #endregion 
} 

public class DataRepository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class     
{     

    private TestErpEntities _context;     

    public DataRepository()     
    {     
    }     

    public DataRepository(TestErpEntities context)     
    {     
        _context = context;     
    }     

    public int Add(T entity)     
    {     
        _context.AddObject(typeof(T).Name, entity);     
        int saveValue = _context.SaveChanges();     
        return saveValue;     
    }     


    public void Dispose()     
    {     
        if (_context != null)     
            _context.Dispose();     
    }
}  

The class destructor (~DataRepository()) and the GC.SupressFinalizer() are not necessary because you don't have any unmanaged resources to release. Many would argue that it's part of the IDisposable pattern, but IMO it's unnecessary.

Also, this:

new DataRepository<Customer>().Dispose(); 

is completely redundant and unnecessary. What you're doing here is creating this object only to destroy it. It has no other function and is just waste of memory/cpu cycles.

share|improve this answer
    
public void Dispose() { GC.SurprizeFinalize(this); } IS OK??? for ErpEntities? –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 20:14
    
You don't need a Dispose() method on ErpEntities at all. You only need Dispose() when you have something that needs to be disposed of, like the database connection or a file handle, or something like that. GC.SurpriseFinalize() only needs to be used if your class has a finalizer, and you don't really need a finalizer unless you have unmanaged resources that you must be sure you dispose of properly. –  CodingGorilla Dec 7 '10 at 20:23
    
// ErpEntities class that needs disposing what do you mean? –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 20:41
    
That's a continuation of the comment line above it. As I said, you have nothing in the ErpEntities class that you need to dispose of; so you can get rid of the IDisposable interface and implementation. –  CodingGorilla Dec 7 '10 at 20:44
    
You can not use using (DataRepository<Customer> repository = new DataRepository<Customer>(new TestErpEntities())) { return repository.Add(new Customer() { Name = Name, SurName = SurName }); } WITHOUT IDISPOSE it is necessary –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 21:01
show 2 more comments

From what you posted, ErpEntities doesn't need to implement IDisposable. It doesn't 'own' anything.

If it did, new ErpEntities().SaveCustomer(...) would be the wrong way to use it.

The DataRepository class doesn't need the destructor (~DataRepository()) and the call(s) to GC.SuppressFinalize(this) can all be removed too.

What you should be left with:

  • if a class contains (owns) an IDisposable class it should implement IDisposable as well and forward the calls to Dispose()

  • the calling code should use IDisposable classes in a using(...) { } block.

  • don't mess with destructors unless you have an unmamaged resource (and even then there are better options)

share|improve this answer
    
how can i call public void Dispose() { if (_context != null) _context.Dispose(); } –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 20:24
    
@Phsika: you can call it like any other method but a using-block is better. –  Henk Holterman Dec 7 '10 at 20:29
    
look please Coding Gorilla . how can i call public void Dispose() { if (_context != null) _context.Dispose(); } –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 20:34
    
i rearranged my codes please look above :) –  Penguen Dec 7 '10 at 21:05
    
@coding has a decent sample and @Steven posted a link to a good example. Just read up on IDisposable, don't just copy code. –  Henk Holterman Dec 7 '10 at 22:11
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