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Lets say that I have a HTML that looks like this:

<div class="aaa"><span>1</span></div>
<div class="aaa"><span>2</span></div>
<div class="aaa"><span>3</span></div>
<div class="aaa"><span>4</span></div>

With $('.aaa span') I can select all span elements.
With $('.aaa').each() I can iterate over the div elements.
My question is how to select the span in each div from inside the each function like:

$('.aaa').each(function(index, obj){
    x = selector_based_on_obj // x equal to the current div`s span
})
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6  
what? <div class=".aaa"> ??? –  Vlad.P Dec 7 '10 at 20:28
1  
I think that should be <div class="aaa">. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:29
    
type mistake, my fault ( –  Ilian Iliev Dec 7 '10 at 20:30
    
api.jquery.com –  user113716 Dec 7 '10 at 20:40
    
Your x variable is an implicit global if you're omitting the var keyword. You should add that. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:42
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

easiest way is this, if you want all the elements

$('.aaa span');

jquery can nest selectors just like css can. also, if for some reason you need to loop

$('.aaa').each(function(){
    x = $(this).find('span');
});

that will set x as the elements as a jquery object.

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1  
You're creating a global variable x here. Probably not what you intended. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:33
1  
I followed the example, i'm not sure if Illian was intending to create a global variable or not, so i simply repeated his scenario to not add confusion. –  Jeremy B. Dec 7 '10 at 20:34
1  
@Jeremy B.: Omitting the var keyword makes the variable an implicit global. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:37
    
@elusive, yes I know. please refer to Illians question, he has x = selector_based... I simply finished his thought. whether or not it is a global variable isn't really important here. –  Jeremy B. Dec 7 '10 at 20:39
    
@Jeremy B.: Right. That is why i upvoted this answer anyway. I just wanted to point that out. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:40
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$(obj).find('span') should do the trick.

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Thank you for the light speed answer, I knew there was a simple solution. –  Ilian Iliev Dec 7 '10 at 20:35
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$('.aaa').each(function(index, obj){
    var x = $(this).find('span');
    $(x).doSomething();
})

or more prgramatically:

$('.aaa').each(function(index, obj){
    $(this).find('span').doSomething();
})
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1  
Are you assigning $(x)? I do not think that this is possible. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:32
    
@elusive, correct. x itself is a jquery object, so calling jquery on it would not be necessary. –  Jeremy B. Dec 7 '10 at 20:33
    
@Jeremy B.: That is not what i meant initially (@FatherStorm corrected that already; it was $(x) = $(this).find('span');), but it is true what you mention. You would not need to wrap x again. x.something(); will do, too. –  elusive Dec 7 '10 at 20:35
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$('.aaa').each(function() {
  var x = $('span', this);
});
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If that's your actual markup, you can easily use the native property firstChild.

$('.aaa').each(function(){
    var x = this.firstChild
});

It is a widely supported property.

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