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I need a tree structure that supports "and" and "or"ing. For example, given a regular expression like ab|c(d|e) I want to turn that into a tree.

So, at first we have two "or" branches... it can either go down ab, or c(d|e). If you head down the ab branch, you get two nodes, a and b (or a followed by b, whatever). Then if you go down the c(d|e) branch, you get c and (d|e), then (d|e) is split into d or e.

Making a tree structure is easy, you just have something like

class Node {
    string element;
    Node[] children;
}

But then how do you know if the children should be "anded" or "ored"? I guess each level of the tree should alternate between "anding" and "oring"

Does that make sense? Can anyone suggest a structure for this?


A few people have suggested storing the "operator" on the node, which is fine, but isn't there a way to take advantage of the fact that each level always alternates or,and,or,and,...?

Edit: Not quite sure why people keep assuming this is a binary tree. It's not. I was hoping the tiny code snippet would tip you off. The example just happens to have only 2 branches.


Currently leaning towards this:

abstract class Node { }

class DataNode : Node
{
    string data;
}

abstract class OpNode : Node
{
    Node[] children;
}

class OrNode : OpNode { }
class AndNode : OpNode { }
share|improve this question
    
I think the alternating AND / OR levels is just a coincidence for this example. In general, you should be able to mix AND and OR on the same level. See my answer. –  mbeckish Dec 7 '10 at 21:30
    
@mbeckish: Is it? Can you provide an example where you wouldn't alternate? –  Mark Dec 7 '10 at 21:33
    
Also, you don't need an array of children (unless you are going to support N-ary operators). –  mbeckish Dec 7 '10 at 21:34
    
@Ralph: a|b|c is one trivial example. –  mbeckish Dec 7 '10 at 21:35
1  
how you make (a|b|c)(de) with every level of tree and or or only ? –  user415789 Dec 7 '10 at 22:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Think of a tree structure where every node represents a boolean expression that can be evaluated to be either true or false - in your case a regular expression (match or non-match). The tree structure itself represents AND and OR: Each route, starting at the root node and ending with a node that has no further children, is a conjunction of expressions, representing AND. The tree

    A
   /
  B
 /
C

would represent A AND B AND C.

Whenever a node has more than 1 child node, there is an OR (disjunction), branching into several routes:

    A
   / \
  B   D
 /
C

represents A AND ((B AND C) OR D)

So you do not even need to store the operators anywhere.

In your example you have the expression ab|c(d|e) so there is no common root expression to evaluate; I suggest the root in this case is simply true and the tree would look like:

   true
   / \
  A   C
 /   / \
B   D   E

For a custom tree class in c# look here Tree data structure in C# or search on or make one of your own.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this!! It removes the need to keep track of the alternation or operators, and its clean and easy to read. –  Mark Feb 5 '12 at 18:10

You could have 2 types of nodes: operator nodes and variable nodes.

The leaves of your tree would all be variable nodes; all other nodes would be operator nodes.

Binary operator nodes would have two children. Unary operator (like NOT) nodes would have 1 child.

For your example ab|c(d|e):

      OR
  /         \
 AND       AND
 / \      /  \
a   b    c   OR
           /  \
          d    e
share|improve this answer
abstract class Node { }

class DataNode : Node {
    public string Data { get; }

    // details
}

class OperatorNode : Node {
    public Node Left { get; }
    public Node Right { get; }
    public BinaryOperator Operator { get; }

    // details
}

abstract class BinaryOperator { // details }

class Or : BinaryOperator { // details }
class And : BinaryOperator { // details }
share|improve this answer
1  
So, how would the example ab|c(d|e) be implemented? –  mbeckish Dec 7 '10 at 21:24
    
Also note that it's not a binary tree, but that's an easy fix. And where is the "data" stored? Only the leaves have data... just put it in the node and leave it as null unless its a leaf? –  Mark Dec 7 '10 at 21:28

Is there anything wrong with this:

enum Operation
{
    None,
    And,
    Or
}

class Node {
    string element;
    Node[] children;
    Operation operation;
}

Edit:

As an example of how ab|c(d|e) would look something like this:

Node root = new Node
        {
            operation = Operation.Or,
            children = new Node[]
            {
                new Node
                {
                    operation = Operation.And,
                    children = new Node[]
                    {
                          new Node{ element = "a" },
                          new Node{ element="b" }
                    }
                },
                new Node
                {
                    children = new Node[]
                    {
                        new Node{ element = "c"},
                        new Node
                        {
                            operation= Operation.Or,
                            children = new Node[]
                            {
                                new Node{ element= "d"},
                                new Node{element = "e"}
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        };
share|improve this answer
    
+1, there is nothing wrong with this :) –  Saeed Amiri Dec 7 '10 at 21:30
    
How would the example ab|c(d|e) be implemented? –  mbeckish Dec 7 '10 at 21:32
    
@mbeckish: I like your approach better though, separating my one Node type into two types (and each new Node would be replaced with new OperatorNode or new ElementNode –  Mark Avenius Dec 7 '10 at 22:36

I did this just a few days ago using ANTLR. ANTLR provided me with a grammar which is represented as an AST Abstract Syntax Tree as you just described and it generated c# code that could handle that grammar.

It's quite nice and elegant. Here are a few example.

share|improve this answer

Just to throw in a slightly different one

interface Node
{
    // top level operations here
}

class OpNode : Node
{
    public Node Left { get; set; }
    public Node Right { get; set; }
}

class AndNode : OpNode
{
    public AndNode(Node left, Node right)
    {
        Left = left;
        Right = right;
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "(" + Left.ToString() + " & " + Right.ToString() + ")";
    }
}

class OrNode : OpNode
{
    public OrNode(Node left, Node right)
    {
        Left = left;
        Right = right;
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "(" + Left.ToString() + " | " + Right.ToString() + ")";
    }
}

class DataNode<T> : Node
{
    T _data;
    public DataNode(T data)
    {
        _data = data;
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _data.ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sounds like mbeckish's solution, but you took it one step further and split the op nodes in two different types as well. –  Mark Dec 7 '10 at 21:40

How about something this simple:

class OrNode {
  string element;
  AndNode[] children;
} 

class AndNode {
  string element;
  OrNode[] children;
} 

Each class could have its own evaluate() which would AND or OR all the children as needed

You may still want to have a parent superclass so that your code could hold generic nodes without worrying about whether the first one was AND or OR.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the only solution so far that forces alternation...and it's simple. I like it. –  Mark Dec 7 '10 at 21:52

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