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Let's say I have a simple table with two columns: id (int) and name (varchar). In this table I store some names which are in Polish, e.g.:

 1 | sępoleński
 2 | świecki
 3 | toruński
 4 | Włocławek

Now, let's say I want to sort the results by name:

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY name;

If I have C locale, I get:

 4 | Włocławek
 1 | sępoleński
 3 | toruński
 2 | świecki

which is wrong, because "ś" should be after "s" and before "t". If I use Polish locale (pl_PL.UTF-8), I get:

 1 | sępoleński
 2 | świecki
 3 | toruński
 4 | Włocławek

which is also not what I want, because I would like names starting with capital letters to be first just like in C locale, like this:

 4 | Włocławek
 1 | sępoleński
 2 | świecki
 3 | toruński

How can I do this?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want it efficient, you'll need to create another column that "naturally" sorts correctly (e.g. even in the C locale), and use that as a sorting criterion. For that, you should use the approach of the strxfrm C library function. As a straight-forward strxfrm table for your approach, replace each letter with two ASCII letters: 's' would become 's0' and 'ś' would become 's1'. Then 'świecki' becomes 's1w0i0e0c0k0i0', and the regular ASCII sorting will sort it correctly.

If you don't want to create a separate column, you can try to use a function in the where clause:

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY strxfrm(name);

Here, strxfrm needs to be replaced with a proper function. Either you write one yourself, or you use the standard translate function (although this doesn't support replacing a character with two of them, so you'll need some more involved transformation).

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was afraid of... I think I'll just add another column, but instead of using ASCII sorting, I will use PL locale sorting and just add some character before the names starting with capital letter or even set the column to True if it starts with a capital letter and then order by additional_column, name. – Juliusz Gonera Dec 9 '10 at 21:32

If you want a custom sort, you must define some function that modifies your values in some way so that the natural ordering of the modified values fits your requirement.

For example, you can append some character or string it the value starts with uppercase:

 CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION mysort(text) returns text IMMUTABLE as $$
   SELECT CASE WHEN substring($1 from 1 for 1) =
   upper( substring($1 from 1 for 1))  then 'AAAA' || $1 else $1 END
   ;
   $$  LANGUAGE SQL;

And then

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY mysort(name);

This is not foolprof (you might want to change 'AAA' for something more apt) and hurts performance, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you know how much this would hurt the performance (have you ever used it)? I don't want it to be too slow... – Juliusz Gonera Dec 9 '10 at 21:30
    
I'd guess it would hurt a lot, specially if there are many rows. I added the IMMUTABLE label, to optimize a little. But if you are really concerned, you should store the values in an additional preprocessed column, as Martin suggested – leonbloy Dec 9 '10 at 22:58
1  
I don't think it would hurt performance a lot, but if it does, you might want to create an index on mytable (mysort(name)) – a_horse_with_no_name Dec 9 '10 at 23:37
    
Well, I'll use the additional column anyway. I think it will be just easier for me to integrate. It's a web app with an ORM and creating a custom function in the database could possibly be harder. I'll remember those suggestions for my future projects though. Thanks! – Juliusz Gonera Dec 12 '10 at 14:05

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