Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The task is to define a function count_vowels(text) that takes a string text, counts the vowels in text (using a Python dictionary for the counting), and returns the vowel frequency information as a string. Example:

>>> count_vowels('count vowels')
'e: 1\nu: 1\no: 2'
>>> print count_vowels('count vowels')
e: 1
u: 1
o: 2

so far I've come up with:

>>> def count_vowels(text):
    counts = nltk.defaultdict(int)
    for w in text:
        if w in 'aeoiu':
            counts[w] += 1
    return counts


>>> count_vowels('count vowels')
defaultdict(<type 'int'>, {'e': 1, 'u': 1, 'o': 2})

so, what's wrong with my code and how do I get the same result as in the example?

share|improve this question
1  
Python has a built-in collections.defaultdict. Using nltk.defaultdict is a bit obscure and confusing. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 7 '10 at 21:41
1  
Please mark your homework with the [homework] tag. –  S.Lott Dec 7 '10 at 22:01
    
Short answer: Your count_vowels() function is returning a nltk.defaultdict(int) instance not a string. You need to add code to the end of your function to return one based on what ends up in the defaultdict and formatted the way you want. –  martineau Dec 8 '10 at 2:50

5 Answers 5

If you are using Python 2.7, try using a counter:

from collections import Counter
counts = Counter(c for c in 'count vowels' if c in 'aeoiu')
for k, v in counts.iteritems():
    print k, v

This results in the output:

e 1
u 1
o 2

If you have an earlier version of Python, you can still use your defaultdict, and just use the same iteritems() loop:

for k, v in counts.iteritems():
    print k, v
share|improve this answer
return '\n'.join( '%s: %s' % item for item in counts.items())
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is the only answer here that returns the string as requested! –  John La Rooy Dec 7 '10 at 23:39
    
Thx S.Lott, I missed a space, 3 is not 4. –  kevpie Dec 8 '10 at 0:17

The result is the same. Are you referring to how the result is formatted? Write some code at the end of the function that converts the resulting dictionary into a string in the right format.

share|improve this answer

I would try:

def count_vowels(text):
vowels = 'aeiou'
counts ={}
s = ''
for letter in text:
    if letter in vowels:
        if letter in counts:
            counts[letter] += 1
        else:
            counts[letter] = 1
for item in counts:
    s = s + item + ': ' + str(counts[item]) + '\n'
return s[:-1]

This outputs:

>>> count_vowels('count vowels')
'e: 1\nu: 1\no: 2'
>>> print count_vowels('count vowels')
e: 1
u: 1
o: 2
share|improve this answer

Here you're returning the entire dictionary of an integer type, I think. Try iterating through the dictionary and printing each key to format it like you want.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.