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I have a recursive json crawler function that looks for a specified function then returns it. However it is returning undefined and I am not sure why.

Here is the script.

function get(what, where){
    where = typeof(where) != 'undefined' ? where : user.object;
    for(entry in where){
        if(typeof(where[entry]) =="string"){
            if (entry == what) {
                result = where[entry];
                console.log(result)
                return result;
            }
        }else if(typeof(where[entry]) =="object"){   
            get(what, where[entry]);
        }
    }
}

the console.log returns correctly but the return statement below it fails.

Thanks for the assistance. :)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's because you're not returning your recursive branch of the code, this:

get(what, where[entry]);

should be:

return get(what, where[entry]);

So on that branch, though you're executing all the way down, you're not returning the result back up, so you get the default return: undefined.

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although that only gets him one value. Not sure if that's what he's after. –  zzzzBov Dec 7 '10 at 22:13
    
@zzzzBov - on the contrary, it goes all the way down into the object to get the value...it's just not being returned back up, the return was always a single value :) –  Nick Craver Dec 7 '10 at 22:15
    
Brilliant, thank you :) –  Cory Gwin Dec 7 '10 at 22:18
    
@Nick Craver that's not what I meant: I was thinking more along the lines of a directory searching algorithm where you want to store all the results (in an array or whatever). After re-reading the question, you've got the right answer. –  zzzzBov Dec 7 '10 at 22:19
    
ok, there is an issue with this solution. When you return the recursive function, return get(what, where[entry]); it stops the for each loop, so it doesn't continue through the loop of other items. –  Cory Gwin Dec 7 '10 at 23:01

If you dont write a return-statement in a JavaScript function, but it reaches its end anyway, then it returns undefined. That is (probably) what has happened here, since if you dont enter the if-statement with the return-statement, you will not get to return anything.

EDIT:

As a rule of thumb, you should ALWAYS return something in every bransch of your code. A static language compiler would have warned you about this, but here you have to make sure yourself.

Example:

function get(what, where){
    where = typeof(where) != 'undefined' ? where : user.object;
    for(entry in where){
        if(typeof(where[entry]) =="string"){
            if (entry == what) {
                result = where[entry];
                console.log(result)
                return result;
            }
        }else if(typeof(where[entry]) =="object"){   
            get(what, where[entry]);
            // Are you sure you don't want to return anything here?.. hm...
        }
    }
    // Here be dragons! What will be returned from the function?
    // Hint: Undefined! :)
}

Both those places could probably use return statements. The last one need one because what if the for-loop doesn't have any entries to enumerate over?

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I checked that, the statement is entered and the console.log statement fires properly. –  Cory Gwin Dec 7 '10 at 22:16
    
Yes, but that might be deeper down the stack. Your function calls itself and it is the return value from the "top" call that will be returned to the original caller. Your printout might come from a deeper call. –  Jakob Dec 7 '10 at 22:18
    
ahh, makes sense. Thank you very much. –  Cory Gwin Dec 7 '10 at 22:22
    
ok, there is an issue with this solution. When you return the recursive function, return get(what, where[entry]); it stops the for each loop, so it doesn't continue through the loop of other items. –  Cory Gwin Dec 7 '10 at 23:02
    
Oh, well, I didn't really try to show you how to implement your functionality. I just wanted to illustrate that you must always use the return-statement in all branches of a function if you want it to actually return something. I hope it wasn't all too confusing :) –  Jakob Dec 8 '10 at 7:21

You probably want to modify the code:

get(what, where[entry]);

to

return get(what, where[entry]);

:-P

share|improve this answer
    
yup, thank you. –  Cory Gwin Dec 7 '10 at 22:24

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