Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating an object literal, which I'm using as a namespace. The object literal (namespace) happens to contain a constructor function, MyConstructor. I want to extend the prototype of MyConstructor, inside the object literal. If I pull the declaration for MyConstructor out and put it above the declaration of myNamespace, all is well, except MyConstructor is no longer namespaced by myNamespace. How best to make this work? The following fails to compile because
of the '.' in this line:

MyConstructor.prototype = {

Object literal provided below.

Thanks, Mike

var myNamespace = {
    a:  3,
    b: function (msg) {
        alert(this.a);
    },
    MyConstructor: function(xx) {
        this.x = xx;
    },
    MyConstructor.prototype = {
        a: 1,
        b: function() {
            return true;
        }
    }
};

Update: The accepted solution works. However, the very premise of my question was flawed. I would not use an object literal at all in this situation, because it is harder to unit test, as I found out. Instead, I would use a normal object created with a constructor, and put the private objects inside it. Another thing is, a "self/immediately executing function", while beautiful in some ways, is a bit harder to explain to a newbie.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You simply cannot do that in an object literal. Sorry.

As for a way to work around it, use a function to create your myNamespace. That way it doesn't have to be a literal, but you can still get the effect of a namespace:

var myNamespace = (function(){

  var ns = {
    a:  3,
    b: function (msg) {
      alert(this.a);
    },
    MyConstructor: function(xx) {
      this.x = xx;
    }
  };

  ns.MyConstructor.prototype = {
    a: 1,
    b: function() {
        return true;
  }

  return ns;
}());

So what happens here is that myNamespace is set to the value of a function that is called immediately and returns the actual namespace object that you're after. No other code can access what's in the function, but since it is inside a function you can do anything, not just object literals. Which solves your problem ;)

share|improve this answer
    
You and meouw were both correct and you both answered in real time, but I could only pick one of your answers. Thanks to both of you. –  Mike Dec 8 '10 at 13:50

Just use the namespace

var myNamespace = {
    myConstructor: function( x ) {
        this.x = x;
    }
}

myNamespace.myConstructor.prototype = {
    //...
}

Or another variation

var myNamespace = (function(){

    function myConstructor(){}

    myConstructor.prototype = {};

    return {
        myConstructor: myConstructor
    }

})();
share|improve this answer
    
Aw, that is of course the easiest way :) My way, with the function, can still be used if some complex hing goes on that should be hidden, but this is obviously a more straightforward solution. –  Jakob Dec 7 '10 at 22:48
    
For this example that would work. The problem is my real object literal has other functions that reference things in MyConstructor's prototype. –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 22:49
    
I see Jakob has suggested my second variation too –  meouw Dec 7 '10 at 22:49
    
Interesting. You were both correct, and both answered in real time. Which one of you should get the prize? :) –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 22:57
    
Whichever you prefer - Jakob provided more textual information which is always a good thing –  meouw Dec 7 '10 at 23:03

How about, create a generator function that returns your MyConstructor. If you create a function called createMyConstructor, then call it immediately, it will return what you want.

var myNamespace = {
    a:  3,
    b: function (msg) {
        alert(this.a);
    },
    MyConstructor: (function createMyConstructor() {
        var cons = function(xx) {
            this.x = xx;
        };
        cons.prototype = {
            a: 1,
            b: function() {
                return true;
        };
        return cons;
    })()
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.