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I have two arrays of hashes. The keys for the hashes are different:

player_scores1 = [{:first_name=>"Bruce", :score => 43, :time => 50},
                  {:first_name=>"Clark", :score => 45, :minutes => 20}]

player_scores2 = [{:last_name=>"Wayne", :points => 13, :time => 40},
                  {:last_name=>"Kent", :points => 3, :minutes => 20}]

I'd like to create a new array of hashes which adds up :score and :points together and assign it to a key called :score. I'd also like to combine the :first_name and :last_name and assign it to a key called :full_name. I want to discard any other keys.

This would result in this array:

all_players = [{:full_name => "Bruce Wayne", :score => 56}, 
               {:full_name => "Clark Kent", :score => 48}]

Is there an elegant way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Something like this:

player_scores1.zip(player_scores2).map { |a,b|
    {
        :full_name => a[:first_name]+' '+b[:last_name],
        :score => a[:score]+b[:points]
    }
}
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Cool, had not heard of the zip method before! –  Chanpory Dec 7 '10 at 23:20
    
This function en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convolution_(computer_science) exists in a lot of languages: Python, Haskell... –  Nakilon Dec 7 '10 at 23:27
2  
+1, but I think it's idiomatic Ruby to use do-end on multi-line blocks. –  tokland Dec 8 '10 at 0:09
    
@tokland, {} != do end. Sometimes you need {}. For example, when I tested this code, I pasted p before it. With do end it will return enumerator and print smth like <#Enumerator... instead of array. –  Nakilon Dec 8 '10 at 2:29
    
@Nakilon what version of ruby are you using? It's working perfectly normal with do end for me on 1.8.7 –  mpd Dec 8 '10 at 3:24

The code you're looking for is:

final = []
player_scores1.each_index do |index|
  entry_1 = player_scores1.values(index)
  entry_2 = player_scores2.values(index)[:first_name]
  score = entry_1[:score] + entry_2[:points]
  final << {:full_name => "#{entry_1[:first_name]} #{entry_2[:last_name]}", :score => score }
end

Any suggestions on tightening this up would be much appreciated!

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Will this work, if the keys are different? –  Chanpory Dec 7 '10 at 23:00
    
Just tried this, and got an error: "NoMethodError: undefined method 'merge' for #<Array:0x102cef1a0> from (irb):15 " –  Chanpory Dec 7 '10 at 23:02
    
just reread the question -- my answer's wrong, let me redo things. –  Sam Ritchie Dec 7 '10 at 23:02

This works. I don't if that's elegant enough though.

player_scores1 = [{:first_name=>"Bruce", :score => 43, :time => 50},
                  {:first_name=>"Clark", :score => 45, :minutes => 20}]

player_scores2 = [{:last_name=>"Wayne", :points => 13, :time => 40},
                  {:last_name=>"Kent", :points => 3, :minutes => 20}]

p (0...[player_scores1.length, player_scores2.length].min).map {|i| {
    :full_name => player_scores1[i][:first_name] + " " + player_scores2[i][:last_name], 
    :score => player_scores1[i][:score] + player_scores2[i][:points]
}}

This example on Codepad.

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This uses zip with a block to loop over the hashes, joining the names and summarizing:

all_players = []
player_scores1.zip(player_scores2) { |a, b| 
  all_players << { 
    :full_name => a[:first_name] + ' ' + b[:last_name],
    :score     => a[:score] + b[:points]
  } 
}
all_players # => [{:full_name=>"Bruce Wayne", :score=>56}, {:full_name=>"Clark Kent", :score=>48}]
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1  
init an empty array + append values in a loop + return the array = map –  tokland Dec 8 '10 at 9:30
    
Usually. This cuts out the usual extra step people would do of zip.each by letting the block for zip do it. There's no point in doing one more iteration over the hashes since zip is already doing a loop over each of them. –  the Tin Man Dec 8 '10 at 9:36

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