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I have a multi-posix-threaded Linux C++ application without a GUI that I want to be able to use the occasional Cocoa control in, namely the file upload/download dialogs and the alert.

I'm far from an expert with Cocoa, but was able to build a few Objective-C++ test/demo apps that worked as intended.

Now that I've integrated the Cocoa code into my application, it seems that I'm having trouble posting things to the main GUI thread. Maybe I didn't do what I needed to do to create one, I'm really not sure. Here's what I have in my .mm file:

#ifdef MACOS
@interface CocoaInterface : NSObject
{
}
- (id) init;
- (void) ShowFileUploadDialog;
- (void) ShowFileDownloadDialog;
@end

@implementation CocoaInterface
- (id) init
{
    cout << "Creating NSAutoreleasePool" << endl;
    NSAutoreleasePool* pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    cout << "Creating NSApplication" << endl;
    NSApplication* app = [[NSApplication alloc] init];
    cout << "Calling NSApplication::finishLaunching" << endl;
    [app finishLaunching];
    [super init];
    return self;
}

- (void) ShowFileUploadDialog
{
    cout << "Entering ShowFileUploadDialog" << endl;
    if ([NSThread isMainThread])
    {
        // Show file dialog
        cout << "Calling NSRunAlertPanel" << endl;
        NSRunAlertPanel(@"This is a test", @"Does it work?", @"Yes", @"No", @"");
    }
    else 
    {
        //NSRunAlertPanel(@"This is a test", @"Does it work?", @"Yes", @"No", @"");
        cout << "Redirecting ShowFileUploadDialog call to main thread." << endl;
        [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(ShowFileUploadDialog) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
    }
}

- (void) ShowFileDownloadDialog
{
    cout << "Entering ShowFileDownloadDialog" << endl;
    if ([NSThread isMainThread])
    {
        // Show file dialog
        cout << "Calling NSRunAlertPanel" << endl;
        NSRunAlertPanel(@"This is a test", @"Does it work?", @"Yes", @"No", @"");
    }
    else
    {
        //NSRunAlertPanel(@"This is a test", @"Does it work?", @"Yes", @"No", @"");
        cout << "Redirecting ShowFileDownloadDialog call to main thread." << endl;
        [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(ShowFileDownloadDialog) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
    }
}
@end 
#endif

I call this from the code I have in the various threads I have processing incoming network messages:

cout << "Creating CocoaInterface." << endl;
CocoaInterface* interface = [[CocoaInterface alloc] init];
cout << "Calling CocoaInterface::ShowFileDownloadDialog." << endl;
[interface ShowFileDownloadDialog];

This hangs on trying to perform the selector -- as if it can never actually find the main thread. A backtrace in GDB shows me waiting on a semaphore forever.

When I uncomment the NSRunAlertPanel call before the performSelectorOnMainThread call, I get a white block in the shape of the dialog, but it doesn't fully draw or process any messages, presumably because it's not on the main GUI thread.

It seems that I don't have a proper GUI thread or just can't get to it from where I am. I suspect that I've missed something in initialization. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question

Instead of explicitly creating an NSApplication object, you should call NSApplicationLoad() which will handle the instantiation and create the event loop for you.

You can also use the NSLog(@"Some string") function instead of all those couts, if you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but it seems that NSApplicationLoad() is meant for Carbon apps and there's no Carbon in this particular application. – Jason Champion Dec 10 '10 at 7:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turns out what I needed was a combination of these two things:

[NSApplication sharedApplication];
[NSApp run];

I've been spoiled by other GUI APIs such as GTK and wxWidgets so that calling

[NSApp terminate: nil];

has caught me off guard by unexpectedly destroying the entire application via an exit(0) call and the rest of the main() never executes, but that's apparently the intended behavior and a topic for another day.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's the intended behavior. It's written somewhere in the documentation. – Yuji Dec 10 '10 at 7:19

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