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Evening all, What would be the correct key sequence to display "\t" as a literal value, and not a text format?

My code is below...

Thanks a bunch.

main()
{

  int c;

  while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {

      if (c == '  ')
          c = "\t";
    putchar(c);
    }

}

So to clarify, I do not want to have a tabbed string, but instead display the characters \t.

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By literal value, do you mean the string? Or the ascii integer value? – Falmarri Dec 7 '10 at 23:37

You can escape a backslash with another backslash, i.e. "\\t".

Incidentally, you're trying to assign a string (i.e. more than one character) to an int. This doesn't make sense!

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Good catch, didn't see that! – Michael K Dec 7 '10 at 23:37

Wouldn't you really want something like this instead?

if (c == '\t')
{
    printf("\\t");
}
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Escape the backslash, thus "\\t".

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To have a backslash in a character/string constant interpreted literally, you have to escape it with another backslash. Also, a single call to putchar() will not be enough since you have to print two characters. With this you get:

putchar('\\');
putchar('t');
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You need to escape the escape, as follows:

printf("\\t");

This will print \t as you want.

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System.out.println, in C? – Karl Knechtel Dec 7 '10 at 23:37
    
-1: C! Not Java. – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 7 '10 at 23:38
    
oi! language hiccup! – Byron Whitlock Dec 7 '10 at 23:39
    
+1 Yes, it is not the same language, but the way to make it remains the same, that is, doubling the `\` character. Instead of downvoting, perhaps simply tell the answerer that he's missing the right language. – Will Marcouiller Dec 7 '10 at 23:40
    
My bad - edited – Michael K Dec 7 '10 at 23:40

Actually "\t" requires two characters to display.

main()
{

  int c;

  while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {

      if (c == '  ') {
       putchar('\\');
       putchar('t');
      }
  }

would be one way of doing it. }

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