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The Django documentation has a [nice section] on handling strings with non-ASCII data in URLs. In particular, it presents the following example on how to transform Unicode strings for use in URLs:

>>> urlquote(u'Paris & Orléans')
u'Paris%20%26%20Orl%C3%A9ans'
>>> iri_to_uri(u'/favorites/François/%s' % urlquote(u'Paris & Orléans'))
'/favorites/Fran%C3%A7ois/Paris%20%26%20Orl%C3%A9ans'

However, there seems to be no indication on how to perform the reverse transformation!

Assuming that my application receives the URL /favorites/Fran%C3%A7ois/Paris%20%26%20Orl%C3%A9ans, how do I map that back to /favorites/François/ and Paris & Orléans?

There is no django.utils.encoding.uri_to_iri function to complement django.utils.encoding.iri_to_uri and there is no django.utils.http.urlunquote to complement django.utils.http.urlquote()!

Note:

If this helps at all, I'm using Django 1.2 over

  • Python 2.5, Debian Linux 32-bit
  • Python 2.6, Windows 7 64-bit.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The standard urllib.unquote() should work just fine in this case:

>>> urllib.unquote('/favorites/Fran%C3%A7ois/Paris%20%26%20Orl%C3%A9ans')
'/favorites/Fran\xc3\xa7ois/Paris & Orl\xc3\xa9ans'
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Whoa, that's weird! urllib.quote() doesn't handle unicode data, but urllib.unquote handles UTF-8 just fine! It works! –  André Caron Dec 7 '10 at 23:51
    
Not quite. urllib.unquote() returns a bytestring, and it is up to you to decode it from UTF-8. urllib.quote() expects a bytestring too, it handles unicode just fine if you encode the unicode string to UTF-8 first. –  Gintautas Miliauskas Dec 8 '10 at 0:02
    
Example: urllib.quote(u'ąčę'.encode('utf8')) => '%C3%A0%C3%A8%C3%A6' –  Gintautas Miliauskas Dec 8 '10 at 0:03
    
Yeah, that's the first thing I did urllib.unquote(x).decode('utf-8') –  André Caron Dec 8 '10 at 0:35

That's because urllib.unquote does this for you:

>>> import urllib
>>> print urllib.unquote('/favorites/Fran%C3%A7ois/Paris%20%26%20Orl%C3%A9ans')
/favorites/François/Paris & Orléans
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