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In my recent operating systems class we have a bunch of objects defined as such:

typedef struct someobj {
  ... stuff ...
} someobj_t;

I know what that does just fine.

The question is that sometimes in the given support code the structs were refered to as struct someobj *some, and sometimes as someobj_t *some. Is there an actual / useful reason to refer to structs in these two different ways, or is just a stylistic difference?

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4  
Are you missing a typedef? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 8 '10 at 0:20
3  
Are you sure you got the question right? someobj_t is an object, not a type, you might have omitted one single typedef in your code. –  Kos Dec 8 '10 at 0:21
1  
the _t notation, assuming you mean a typedef, if just a convention to distinguish struct someobj and someobj (assuming this was the typedef'd name) -- this is because C has two different "namespaces" for these (struct and typedef), and presumably this convention helps add semantics to the code. –  user166390 Dec 8 '10 at 0:37
    
@Ignacio - Yes. –  Donnie Dec 8 '10 at 1:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming we're asking about the following code (there's no typedef in the question as I'm writing, but I'm assuming it was meant to be there):

typedef struct someobj {
    // content
} someobj_t;

Actually usually it'd be sufficient to omit the name someobj and use someobj_t consistently. However there's that situation when you want the struct to refer to itself:

typedef struct someobj {
    struct someobj* next;
    // cannot say someobj_t* yet - typedef not complete
} someobj_t;

// and from now on, both struct someobj and`someobj_t are equivalent
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While it's up to you whether you use a typedef or the struct name, there is a very good reason not to use typedef names ending in _t. All such names are reserved by POSIX for use by the implementation, and may refer to implementation-specific types or may be standardized in future versions of POSIX. Unfortunately many library authors ignore this.

Personally I prefer not to use typedef for structures, but if you do choose to use it, at least avoid the reserved namespace.

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The authors may not know that you can (or don't prefer to) omit the someobj. If you want only one way to refer to the type, then you can write:

typedef struct {
  ...
} someobj_t;

As Kos mentions in another answer, this is fine as long as the structure doesn't need to refer to itself (e.g. in a linked list). For maximum confusion, you could always do:

typedef struct someobj_t {
  ...
} someobj_t;
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Assuming you meant:

typedef struct someobj
{
    /* ... */
} someobj_t;

the difference in general is just stylistic; some people prefer to stick to the "old C"-style naming for structs (where you have to put the struct keyword any time you're referring to that type), others like the more synthetic way of just using someobj_t.

Many people who use the symbol defined by the typedef feel it more natural because often they come from other languages (e.g. C++, C#, ...) where there's no need for the struct thing. In many cases they even omit the struct name from the declaration and just leave the typedefed name.

The usage of those two symbols is in general equivalent, but there are some caveats; first of all, before the end of the typedef the _t version doesn't exist, so you cannot declare pointers to the structure inside itself using the _t name.

Then, the typedef "exists" only during the compilation; this means that the compiler and the debugger will refer to your symbol with the non-typedefed name. If you use a typedef without a "real" structure name, when you have to investigate errors with some compilers/debuggers you may go mad because you can't refer to a "real" structure name, since typedefed structures without a real name actually are anonymous structures.

This can become particularly problematic if you have to export your structure with MIDL and stuff like that; see this post by Raymond Chen for more details.

Last but not least, you can do forward declarations just with the real structure name; and if you don't have a structure name (but just the typedef) you cannot do forward declarations.

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Huh? Since when does the linker know about type names at all? –  R.. Dec 8 '10 at 1:04
    
@R.: you're right, I think I wrote that because I'm used to the linker errors in C++, where the linker refer to the type of the class to which the faulty method belongs (even if those types are just the result of demangling the method names). –  Matteo Italia Dec 8 '10 at 1:13

I think you mean

typedef struct someobj {
 ... stuff ...
} someobj_t;

This allows you to use someobj_t as a type instead of struct someobj. Both notations are equivalent.

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