Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am really new to Unit testing, and I have the following really basic program:

#include "stdafx.h"


// classes example
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class CRectangle {
    int x, y;
  public:
    void set_values (int,int);
    int area () {return (x*y);}
 bool isEq ();
};

void CRectangle::set_values (int a, int b) {
  x = a;
  y = b;
}

bool CRectangle::isEq () {
  if(x==y)
  {
   return true;
  }
  else
  {
   return false;
  }


}
int main () {
  CRectangle rect;
  rect.set_values (3,3);
  cout << "area: " << rect.area();
  cout << "  isEq: " << rect.isEq() << "  \n";
  return 0;
}

I want to know how do I test the method isEq? I want 100% code coverage of this method and I want to use the Boost test framework. Any ideas? I am using VS 2009 SP1, what do I build and run? I am very confused with Unit testing.

UPDATE:

Thanks Stuart, however what Im doing is still not making sense. I know have the following code with the following file names:

//FILENAME: test.cpp
#include "stdafx.h"
#define BOOST_TEST_MODULE isEq Test
#include <boost/test/included/unit_test.hpp>
#include "CRectangle.h"

BOOST_AUTO_TEST_CASE(isEq_test)
{
    CRectangle rect;
    rect.set_values(5,5);
    BOOST_CHECK_EQUAL(rect.isEq(), true);
    rect.set_values(23,9);
    BOOST_CHECK_EQUAL(rect.isEq(), false);
}

// FILENAME: CRectangle.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "CRectangle.h"
//#include <boost/test/included/unit_test.hpp>

// classes example
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


void CRectangle::set_values (int a, int b) {
  x = a;
  y = b;
}

bool CRectangle::isEq () {
  if(x==y)
  {
      return true;
  }
  else
  {
      return false;
  }


}

int main () {
 CRectangle rect;
 rect.set_values (3,3);
 cout << "area: " << rect.area();
 cout << "  isEq: " << rect.isEq() << "  \n";
 return 0;
}

//FILENAME: CRectangle.h
//void CRectangle::set_values (int a, int b);
//bool CRectangle::isEq ();

#ifndef CRECTANGLE_H
#define CRECTANGLE_H

class CRectangle {
    int x, y;
  public:
    void set_values (int,int);
    int area () {return (x*y);}
    bool isEq ();
};


#endif

// FILENAME: stdafx.h : include file for standard system include files,
// or project specific include files that are used frequently, but
// are changed infrequently
//

#pragma once

#include "targetver.h"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <tchar.h>



// TODO: reference additional headers your program requires here
#ifdef _UT
#define ut_private public
#define ut_protected public
#else
#define ut_private private
#define ut_protected protected
#endif

I want to remind you that I am using Visual Studio 2008 SP1 (running this project as a win32 console app). Whenever I build the following files it gives me errors. I am also unsure how the Boost lib is supposed to give me results of my test??? Will a new window open up??? What will happen exactly?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simplest way to test it is to do something like this (I'm not attempting to write great test cases, I'll leave that to you):

#define BOOST_TEST_MODULE isEq Test
#include <boost/test/included/unit_test.hpp>

#include "CRectangle.h"

BOOST_AUTO_TEST_CASE(isEq_test)
{
    CRectangle rect;
    rect.set_values(5,5);
    BOOST_CHECK_EQUAL(rect.isEq(), true);
    rect.set_values(23,9);
    BOOST_CHECK_EQUAL(rect.isEq(), false);
}

No need to build Boost.Test if you do that, you just include the header and away you go. Hope that helps a bit!

p.s. As a side comment, you might want to pick a naming scheme for your functions and stick to it -- having both set_values and isEq looks a bit inconsistent, for what it's worth...

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply, but I am still confused, which header am I meant to include? Am I meant to write the header file myself. I am not a c++ programmer by trade, however I know c relatively well. –  user531571 Dec 8 '10 at 4:27
    
Also where do I put the code that you wrote above? Should I put it in another .cpp file? or the same file as the code I wrote in my first post (name demonstration.cpp). Also how do you write my header file? –  user531571 Dec 8 '10 at 4:32
    
By "include the header", I meant the one in the above code, i.e. boost/test/included/unit_test.hpp. The way I structured things was to have a library with all the stuff I wanted to test in it, then I wrote the main program and a set of unit test programs which linked against the library. Each unit test program just looks a bit like the above, but includes the header file of whatever you're trying to test, e.g. #include "CRectangle.h". You don't need a main function in your test programs -- Boost.Test handles that all automatically -- you just need to write the sort of thing shown above. –  Stuart Golodetz Dec 8 '10 at 13:07
    
support I have class skeleton in CRectangle.h and definition in CRectangle.cpp, how would the test method get reference to the class method? –  Pritesh Acharya Feb 6 at 11:06
2  
@PriteshAcharya You have to link CRectangle.cpp with your test program. There is no difference to when you use CRectangle in a normal program. –  MauganRa Feb 10 at 14:13
show 4 more comments

To continue the answer :

The class and functions in the source file need to be exported, so that they can be used in the Unit test file as follows :

//CRectangle.h

#define DLLEXPORT __declspec(dllexport)

class DLLEXPORT CRectangle
{
...
}

// CRectangle.cpp

void DLLEXPORT  CRectangle::set_values (int a, int b)
{
...
}

bool DLLEXPORT  CRectangle::isEq ()
{
..
}

On compiling the CRectangle source.lib.

Finally link the Unit Test program with source.lib, include "CRectangle.h" and call the functions in CRectangle.

Hope this helps..

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.