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This:

SELECT * 
  FROM tbl_playlists, tbl_playlistsongs 
 WHERE tbl_playlists.playlist_id = tbl_playlistsongs.playlist_id 
   AND tbl_playlists.playlist_id = 1

...works no problem. But:

DELETE from tbl_playlists, tbl_playlistsongs 
 WHERE tbl_playlists.playlist_id = tbl_playlistsongs.playlist_id 
   AND tbl_playlists.playlist_id = 1

...says I have a syntax error. They're identical other than the SELECT * vs DELETE. It still makes perfect logical sense to me.. but I must be missing something!

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Traditional SQL doesn't support multi-table deletions, but MySQL does. That means you're using MySQL specific syntax:

DELETE pl, pls
  FROM TBL_PLAYLISTS pl
  JOIN TBL_PLAYLISTSONGS pls ON pls.playlist_id = pl.playlist_id
 WHERE pl.playlist_id = 1

Reference:

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, never knew MySQL supported join deletes. – Kaleb Brasee Dec 8 '10 at 3:53
    
@Kaleb Brasee: MySQL UPDATE statements as well - too bad it isn't more common, because it's very helpful. – OMG Ponies Dec 8 '10 at 3:54
    
So you have to use the actual JOIN notation, not just do it associatively (whatever the proper term is...) Very interesting! – Damon Dec 8 '10 at 3:59
    
@Damon: ANSI-92 vs ANSI-89 JOIN syntax; ANSI-92 is the preferred syntax, in case you want to use an OUTER JOIN (LEFT, RIGHT) but there's no performance difference. – OMG Ponies Dec 8 '10 at 4:00

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