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In C++98

12.6.2/4 : After the call to a constructor for class X has completed, if a member of X is neither specified in the constructor's mem-initializers, nor default-initialized, nor initialized during execution of the body of the constructor, the member has indeterminate value.

What does nor initialized during execution of the body of the constructor mean? Can a member be initialized inside the body of the constructor?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

nor initialized during execution of the body of the constructor is not correct IMHO.

The wordings have been changed in C++03 from nor initialized (in C++98) to nor given a value

After the call to a constructor for class X has completed, if a member of X is neither specified in the constructor’s mem-initializers, nor default-initialized, nor value-initialized, nor given a value during execution of the body of the constructor, the member has indeterminate value.

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I don't have a copy of C++03. From where can I get it? –  Bazinga Dec 8 '10 at 4:08
    
IOW in the fragment "nor initialized during execution of the body of the constructor", the C++03 standard uses the word "initialized" in an informal way to mean "assigned a value". –  j_random_hacker Dec 8 '10 at 4:15
3  
@Bazinga : You can't get it for free. –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 8 '10 at 4:16
1  
@j_random_hacker, same in 4.1 "If the object to which the glvalue refers is not an object of type T and is not an object of a type derived from T, or if the object is uninitialized, a program that necessitates this conversion has undefined behavior.". –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 8 '10 at 4:46
    
@Bazinga: Amazon (and proabably others) have a dead-tree version , ISBN 978-0470846742. –  MSalters Dec 8 '10 at 11:36

It's actually very simple. class/struct members can include objects with default constructors, but if they don't, and you don't bother to give them a value in the initialiser list, nor set them within the body of the constructor, then basically the memory that they occupy - whatever was scrounged for them from the stack or heap - will still have old garbage in there, i.e. an indeterminate value.

Consider:

struct X
{
    X() : x1(1) { x2 = 2; }
    double x1, x2, x3;
    std::string x4;
};

Here, x1 and x2 are explicitly initialised by X's constructor, and x4 - being a std::string - is default constructed to be "" / length 0. x3, however, could be anything - and shouldn't be read from until after it's been set (it's undefined behaviour and really could bite on some systems - consider that the bit pattern of the memory it occupies may not even be a valid value for a double, so reading from it might trigger some CPU exception/trap/interrupt).

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I don't have a copy of C++03. From where can I get it? –  Bazinga Dec 8 '10 at 4:11
    
Only the final draft is available for free - a quick google turns up many sources - e.g. kuzbass.ru:8086/docs/isocpp. That's usually most convenient for me, but you can order an official copy of the final version for some small fee (20 or 30 dollars US)... I can't remember exactly where from. –  Tony D Dec 8 '10 at 4:20
1  
@Bazinga: see [6.3] in parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/big-picture.html#faq-6.13 for instructions on getting a copy of the Standard. –  Tony D Dec 8 '10 at 4:35

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