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I have a class Matrix which contains ArrayList<ArrayList<Double>> matrix; inside, and I want to know which is preferred when I want to copy instances of that class.

  1. Should I implement clone
  2. Use unmodifiable list HINT I don't know how to do that on an ArrayList
  3. Do custom copyEntries(){return Matrix(this); , and a copy constructor (Matrix other)

P.S

  1. I'm flexible if there was a better type recommendation like vector of vector
  2. if List<List<Double>> and then new ArrayList<Double> is that better ?
  3. I've used Apache commons, and some other libs but at the end I found It should be custom made matrix class.
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Which is preffered when you want to do what? –  OscarRyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:20
    
I want to copy instances of this class –  Ismail Marmoush Dec 8 '10 at 8:22
    
Thanks for asking I edited the question for more clarification –  Ismail Marmoush Dec 8 '10 at 8:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If what you try to do is to copy the matrix, bear in mind Double is unmodifiable so, it doesn't make much sense, creating new instances. You can freely copy the references using something like:

List> copy = new ArrayList>(); copy.addAll( original );

Then you can modify any of the elements and the original won't be changed:

copy.get( 0 ) .get( 0 ) = -1.0; 

// original at ( 0,0 ) remains the same ... 

Ok, I get my compiler and created a running sample to probe my point of not cloning the values.

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class CopyMatrix { 
    public static void main( String [] args ) { 

        Matrix m = new Matrix();
        m.add( Arrays.asList(0.0, 1.0, 2.0 ));
        m.add( Arrays.asList(3.0, 4.0, 5.0 ));
        m.add( Arrays.asList(6.0, 7.0, 8.0 ));

        System.out.println("m = \n" +  m );

        Matrix m1 = m.copy() ;

        m1.get( 0 ).set( 0 , 100.0 );
        m1.get( 2 ).set( 2 , -400.0 );


        System.out.printf( "After m = %n %s %n m1 = %n %s %n", m, m1);
    }
}
class Matrix extends ArrayList<List<Double>> {
    public Matrix copy() {
        Matrix copy = new Matrix();
        for( List<Double> each : this ) { 
            copy.add( new ArrayList<Double>( each ) );
        }
        return copy;
    }
}

Output:

 java CopyMatrix 
m = 
[[0.0, 1.0, 2.0], [3.0, 4.0, 5.0], [6.0, 7.0, 8.0]]
After m = 
 [[0.0, 1.0, 2.0], [3.0, 4.0, 5.0], [6.0, 7.0, 8.0]] 
 m1 = 
 [[100.0, 1.0, 2.0], [3.0, 4.0, 5.0], [6.0, 7.0, -400.0]] 

It works!!

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I don't even know if that compiles, let me get my compiler .. hold on –  OscarRyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:25
    
There is no .get(0) = –  dspyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:27
    
Doubles are immutable but ArrayLists are not. –  khachik Dec 8 '10 at 8:29
    
@hhachik So true, I miss that part. Still my original answer of not copying the doubles remain, I'll update my answer –  OscarRyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:37
    
I really like the hint of extending ArrayList<List<Double> directly, instead of declaring a variable inside the class. –  Ismail Marmoush Dec 8 '10 at 10:37

I would probably use

class Matrix implements Cloneable {

Then, in the clone method:

matrix = new ArrayList<ArrayList<Double>>(other.matrix.size());
for(ArrayList<Double> vector:other.matrix){
    matrix.add(vector.clone());
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no need to clone –  OscarRyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:38
    
There is if ismail plans to modify matrix in one instance but not in another. –  dspyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:41
    
@dpyz, yes i will of course modify it, but can you clarify your code please ? cause I don't know where <Matrix> goes –  Ismail Marmoush Dec 8 '10 at 8:58
    
That's part of the class declaration. Sorry, I left out the word class. I'll edit it. –  dspyz Dec 8 '10 at 8:59
    
sorry but it says (The type Cloneable is not generic; it cannot be parameterized with arguments <matrix> ) –  Ismail Marmoush Dec 8 '10 at 9:08

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