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I've try catch finally block and if some exception occurs I'll return from the catch block, so finally block is still executed, if so, when? Before return or after return?

Is this the right practice?

try
{
// do something
}

catch (Exception)
{    
  return false;
}
finally
{
  if (connection.State == ConnectionState.Open) connection.Close();
}
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3  
You can found out if you set a breakpoint at both lines in the catch and in the finally? –  RvdK Dec 8 '10 at 10:28
    
Tricky one...... I know ! - you could run it and see what happens. –  Andy Morris Dec 8 '10 at 17:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It will execute "finally" block after return. "Finally" is used for some practice such as close database connection (always need to be done)

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One would think that finally is not needed if you use using. –  Dialecticus Dec 8 '10 at 10:32
    
using can only be applied to instances that implement the IDisposeable interface and the compiler will transform the using block to an adequate try...finally block. Edit: Replaced ICloneable with IDisposable –  Dennis Dec 8 '10 at 10:35
    
@Dialectus: that is a reasonable assumption, given that using is syntactic sugar that makes the compiler issue a call to Dispose with a finally block. –  Fredrik Mörk Dec 8 '10 at 10:36
    
@Dennis: Isn't that IDisposable? –  Dialecticus Dec 8 '10 at 10:36
2  
@Dennis: you are aware that it is not recommended to use ICloneable? See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/699210/… –  Fredrik Mörk Dec 8 '10 at 11:01

finally block is always executed. In your case it is executed before your return statement.

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I think finally is executed after return statement, but before the execution goes back to calling function. return -> finally -> go back. –  Dialecticus Dec 8 '10 at 10:35
    
Debbuger goes to return statement first and next to the finally block. But the program goes to the finally block first and after it leaves the method. So I can reasonably say that the finally block is executed before the return (leave the method) statement. –  Nicolas Dec 8 '10 at 10:50
3  
The C# Language Specification is quite clear on the order in which things happens: 1) the expression in the return statment is evaluated, 2) the finally block is executed (this is repeated for any enclosing try-finally blocks), 3) control is returned to the caller. So, finally is executed after the return statement is evaluated, but before control is returned to the caller. –  Fredrik Mörk Dec 8 '10 at 11:29
    
I agree, thanks for your clear explanation. –  Nicolas Dec 8 '10 at 12:25
    
@Fredrik: That would have been answer instead of comment. –  JPReddy Dec 9 '10 at 9:27

You can try with your self

private bool test()
    {
        try
        {
            int i = 0;
           int u = 10 / i;
        }

        catch (Exception)
        {
            return false;
        }
        finally
        {

        }
        return true;
    }

so it is a divideby zero exception. When you execute this code , finally will execute and after return will execute.

it is something like Runtime the returned result in case of finally block!

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A finally block will always execute before the code exits a try-catch-finally block (any condition like a ThreadAbortException which prevents the finally block from executing will prevent code from exiting the try-catch-finally block).

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