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I am looking for a way to concatenate the strings of a field within a group by query. So for example, I have a table:

ID   COMPANY_ID   EMPLOYEE
1    1            Anna
2    1            Bill
3    2            Carol
4    2            Dave

and I wanted to group by company_id to get something like:

COMPANY_ID   EMPLOYEE
1            Anna, Bill
2            Carol, Dave

There is a built-in function in mySQL to do this group_concat

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Markus Döring's answer is technically better. –  pstanton Sep 1 '11 at 1:11
    
@pstanton, Döring's answer is only better for 8.4 and below. –  Jared Beck Jul 29 '13 at 19:32
    
This question appears to be better suited for dba.stackexchange.com. –  Dave Jarvis Oct 3 at 22:17

10 Answers 10

up vote 157 down vote accepted

Update as of PostgreSQL 9.0:

Recent versions of Postgres (since late 2010) have the string_agg(expression, delimiter) function that will do exactly what the question asked for, even letting you specify the delimiter string:

SELECT company_id, string_agg(employee, ', ')
FROM mytable
GROUP BY company_id;

Update as of PostgreSQL 8.4:

PostgreSQL 8.4 (in 2009) introduced the aggregate function array_agg(expression) which concatenates the values into an array. Then array_to_string() can be used to give the desired result:

SELECT company_id, array_to_string(array_agg(employee), ', ')
FROM mytable
GROUP BY company_id;

Original Answer (for pre-8.4 PostgreSQL):

There is no built-in aggregate function to concatenate strings. It seems like this would be needed, but it's not part of the default set. A web search however reveals some manual implementations the same example:

CREATE AGGREGATE textcat_all(
  basetype    = text,
  sfunc       = textcat,
  stype       = text,
  initcond    = ''
);

Here is the CREATE AGGREGATE documentation.

In order to get the ", " inserted in between them without having it at the end, you might want to make your own concatenation function and substitute it for the "textcat" above. Here is one I put together but haven't tested (update: tested on 8.3.12 and working fine):

CREATE FUNCTION commacat(acc text, instr text) RETURNS text AS $$
  BEGIN
    IF acc IS NULL OR acc = '' THEN
      RETURN instr;
    ELSE
      RETURN acc || ', ' || instr;
    END IF;
  END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Note: The function above will output a comma even if the value in the row is null/empty, which outputs:

a, b, c, , e, , g

If you would prefer to remove extra commas to output:

a, b, c, e, g

just add an ELSIF check to the function:

CREATE FUNCTION commacat_ignore_nulls(acc text, instr text) RETURNS text AS $$
  BEGIN
    IF acc IS NULL OR acc = '' THEN
      RETURN instr;
    ELSIF instr IS NULL OR instr = '' THEN
      RETURN acc;
    ELSE
      RETURN acc || ', ' || instr;
    END IF;
  END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
share|improve this answer
1  
I had to S&R varchar to text (latest pgsql stable) but this is great! –  Kev Nov 18 '08 at 16:26
1  
You can write the function in SQL only, which is easier for installation (plpgsql has to be installed by the superuser). See my post for an example. –  bortzmeyer Dec 9 '08 at 19:55
8  
"There is no built-in aggregate function to concatenate strings" - why wouldn't you use array_to_string(array_agg(employee), ',')? –  pstanton Sep 1 '11 at 1:11
1  
+1 for the PostgreSQL 9.0 function. If you need to be concerned about pre-9.0, Markus's answer is better. –  Brad Koch Nov 4 '11 at 16:17
2  
Note that recent versions of Postgres also allow an Order By clause inside the aggregate function, e.g. string_agg(employee, ',' Order By employee) –  IMSoP Apr 6 '13 at 11:58

How about using Postgres built-in array functions? At least on 8.4 this works out of the box:

SELECT company_id, array_to_string(array_agg(employee), ',')
FROM mytable
GROUP BY company_id;
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1  
this works great, thanks! –  case nelson May 26 '10 at 22:42
    
I knew this functionality was here - thanks! –  thetaiko Jun 23 '11 at 14:37
3  
This is a much better answer than the selected answer, as it's already built into 8.4. –  A.J. Brown Sep 28 '11 at 16:22

I claim no credit for the answer because I found it after some searching:

What I didn't know is that PostgreSQL allows you to define your own aggregate functions with CREATE AGGREGATE

This post on the PostgreSQL list shows how trivial it is to create a function to do what's required:

CREATE AGGREGATE textcat_all(
  basetype    = text,
  sfunc       = textcat,
  stype       = text,
  initcond    = ''
);

SELECT company_id, textcat_all(employee || ', ')
FROM mytable
GROUP BY company_id;
share|improve this answer

As from PostgreSQL 9.0 you can use the aggregate function called string_agg. Your new SQL should look something like this:

SELECT company_id, string_agg(employee, ', ')
FROM mytable
GROUP BY company_id;

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As already mentioned, creating your own aggregate function is the right thing to do. Here is my concatenation aggregate function (you can find details in French):

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION concat2(text, text) RETURNS text AS '
    SELECT CASE WHEN $1 IS NULL OR $1 = \'\' THEN $2
            WHEN $2 IS NULL OR $2 = \'\' THEN $1
            ELSE $1 || \' / \' || $2
            END; 
'
 LANGUAGE SQL;

CREATE AGGREGATE concatenate (
  sfunc = concat2,
  basetype = text,
  stype = text,
  initcond = ''

);

And then use it as:

SELECT company_id, concatenate(employee) AS employees FROM ...
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This latest announcement list snippet might be of interest if you'll be upgrading to 8.4:

Until 8.4 comes out with a super-effient native one, you can add the array_accum() function in the PostgreSQL documentation for rolling up any column into an array, which can then be used by application code, or combined with array_to_string() to format it as a list:

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/xaggr.html

I'd link to the 8.4 development docs but they don't seem to list this feature yet.

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Following up on Kev's answer, using the Postgres docs:

First, create an array of the elements, then use the built-in array_to_string function.

CREATE AGGREGATE array_accum (anyelement)
(
 sfunc = array_append,
 stype = anyarray,
 initcond = '{}'
);

select array_to_string(array_accum(name),'|') from table group by id;
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Following yet again on the use of a custom aggregate function of string concatenation: you need to remember that the select statement will place rows in any order, so you will need to do a sub select in the from statement with an order by clause, and then an outer select with a group by clause to aggregate the strings, thus:

SELECT custom_aggregate(MY.special_strings)
FROM (SELECT special_strings, grouping_column 
        FROM a_table 
        ORDER BY ordering_column) MY
GROUP BY MY.grouping_column
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I found this PostgreSQL documentation helpful: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.0/interactive/functions-conditional.html.

In my case, I sought plain SQL to concatenate a field with brackets around it, if the field is not empty.

select itemid, 
  CASE 
    itemdescription WHEN '' THEN itemname 
    ELSE itemname || ' (' || itemdescription || ')' 
  END 
from items;
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In case anyone comes across this looking for a compatibilty shim for pre-9.0 databases, it is possible to implement everything in string_agg except the ORDER BY clause (which is a syntax extension also introduced in 9.0).

So with the below definition this will work the same as in a 9.x Postgres DB:

SELECT string_agg(name, '; ') AS semi_colon_separated_names FROM things;

But this will be a syntax error:

SELECT string_agg(name, '; ' ORDER BY name) AS semi_colon_separated_names FROM things;
--> ERROR: syntax error at or near "ORDER"

Tested on PostgreSQL 8.3.

CREATE FUNCTION string_agg_transfn(text, text, text)
    RETURNS text AS 
    $$
        BEGIN
            IF $1 IS NULL THEN
                RETURN $2;
            ELSE
                RETURN $1 || $3 || $2;
            END IF;
        END;
    $$
    LANGUAGE plpgsql IMMUTABLE
COST 1;

CREATE AGGREGATE string_agg(text, text) (
    SFUNC=string_agg_transfn,
    STYPE=text
);
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