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Below is my code and it doesn't work. After I rename the "click()" to "click1()" it works, why?

<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function click() {
            document.getElementById("content").innerHTML = "abc";
        }
    </script>
</head>

<body>
    <button onclick="click()">try it</button><br />
    <div id="content"></div>
</body>
</html>
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I don't think any of the answers adequately explain the issue here. –  Pointy Dec 8 '10 at 14:39
    
Also note that changing the "onclick" to "window.click()" makes it work –  Pointy Dec 8 '10 at 14:47
    
Thank you all. I'm a beginner. I think I have to speed up my learning at w3school. It's my first post on stackoverflow.com. I'm so happy it's very active and kind here. To Pointy: I will try window.click() after I learn more.. –  micahli123 Dec 8 '10 at 15:12

7 Answers 7

The string values of "onfoo" handler attributes are interpreted as the bodies of handler functions. In other words, it's as if the string value of the attribute is passed to new Function("event", str) with the result being the handler function used.

Additionally, the lexical scope of the function is established as follows, taken from the HTML5 spec (which I consult only in its capacity of a comprehensive description of browser behavior):

Lexical Environment Scope
* Let Scope be the result of NewObjectEnvironment(the element's Document, the global environment).
* If the element has a form owner, let Scope be the result of NewObjectEnvironment(the element's form owner, Scope).
* Let Scope be the result of NewObjectEnvironment(the element's object, Scope).

Thus it's as if there are up to two nested with blocks implicitly wrapped around the code. Thus in this case the effect is that of calling this:

var handler = new Function("event", "with (this) { click(); }");

Because there's a "click" method on the DOM element corresponding to the <button>, that function is what's called by the handler, not the global one established by the script tag. If the "onclick" attribute is set to "window.click();" then the page works properly.

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1  
+1, for a real answer at last ;-) –  Andy E Dec 8 '10 at 15:33

There's already a function called click, responsible for calling the event handler. By declaring another, you override the first, so the event doesn't work anymore.

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Where is this "click" function? Why is it in lexical scope when the string value of the "onclick" attribute is (effectively) given to eval() by the browser? –  Pointy Dec 8 '10 at 15:03
    
@Pointy: It's a function of the element. –  thejh Dec 8 '10 at 15:11
    
Yes thanks - the answer can be found in the HTML 5 spec, and probably elsewhere. The text of the "onclick" attribute is interpreted as a function body, but with the added twist of an implicit with block referring to the element. If it were in a <form>, then that too would get an implicit with block. –  Pointy Dec 8 '10 at 15:30
    
This helped me. I had a function called "export()" that I couldn't get to fire. I was going down a rabbit hole looking for problems until figuring out that the name of the method was the problem. Thanks! –  Kirk Liemohn Jun 12 '12 at 19:26

click is a already defined for the document. The engine doesn't like when you redefine its events.

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click() is the inbuilt of javascript's button object.

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You should perhaps consider using jQuery to refactor your code:

<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>

<body>
    <button id="button1">try it</button><br />
    <div id="content"></div>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function() {
            $("#button1").click(function() {
                $("#content").html("abc");
            });
        });
    </script>
</body>
</html>
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1  
Thank you for your tutorial. I think I have to learn jQuery as I have already learned some javascript. Thank you for your instruction in using the jQuery file in google server other than my server. –  micahli123 Dec 9 '10 at 7:00

click() a reserved name for a method used in HTML5 http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/webappapis.html

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click is predefined event. You should not use predefined events.

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