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Is it possible to change text printed with "cout"? I would like to make it show the current percentage of something without having to have a new line for each percentage. Is this possible?

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cout is not supposed to be an abstracton of a console, although most terminals will gladly interpret the carriage return character properly. –  lijie Dec 8 '10 at 14:41
    
what is for console then? –  nebkat Dec 8 '10 at 15:05
    
you need to clarify your question, it's not clear what you're trying to achieve and what "change" means. –  Gene Bushuyev Dec 8 '10 at 15:11
    
In general it is not possible. (imagine that the output from cout is fed directly to a printer. How would you instruct it to "unprint" the last line?) cout is an output stream, it makes no assumptions about which medium the output is sent to, or about the capabilities of that medium. Specific tricks can achieve what you want in some cases, but will fail horribly in others. If you want anything more dynamic than straight output of plain text, perhaps cout isn't the right tool to use. –  jalf Dec 8 '10 at 15:47
    
std::cout does not assume that the output foes to the terminal. There are libs out there that understand the appropriate control sequence for terminals that allow you to manipulate the cursor position explicitly (Example ncurses). For simple one off applications that are doing simple output though '\r' should be enough. –  Loki Astari Dec 8 '10 at 15:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This works for me:

std::cout << "1111";
std::cout << "\r";
std::cout << "2222";

\r is a carriage return symbol. Puts the "cursor" back to the beginning of the line.

Alternatively you can use \b character. This is backspace. When printed it goes one character back.

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You have 3 \r (carriage return) more than you actually need (unless you meant \b, backspace) –  Hasturkun Dec 8 '10 at 14:42
    
Thanks, I already edited that. –  detunized Dec 8 '10 at 14:42
    
The proper end-of-line symbol is "\n", not "\r". The standard library will interpret "\n" as CR-LF, LF-CR, or whatever is appropriate for your platform. There is also std::endl, which additionally forces flushing of the buffer. –  Gene Bushuyev Dec 8 '10 at 15:09
    
@Gene Bushuyev: What are you talking about? OP asked for backspace or carriage return, to overwrite previous output. –  detunized Dec 8 '10 at 15:12
    
@Gene: \r is a line feed, \n is a new line. What the OP is asking for is how to overwrite data that is already on the console, not how to add new lines to it. \r will force the cursor back to the start of the current line (and future output will overwrite whatever was there). \b will erase the last character on the console and future output will replace it. Which is exactly what the OP was asking for. –  Zac Howland Dec 8 '10 at 15:32

In general it is not possible. (imagine that the output from cout is fed directly to a printer. How would you instruct it to "unprint" the last line?) cout is an output stream, it makes no assumptions about which medium the output is sent to, or about the capabilities of that medium. Specific tricks can achieve what you want in some cases, but will fail horribly in others. If you want anything more dynamic than straight output of plain text, perhaps cout isn't the right tool to use.

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One thing that you will definitely not get from cout is terminal line length. As this can be changed, you might use too long lines, which (using '\r') will cause printing new lines every update. If you want to use specific platform then use platform-specific functions to obtain terminal size (mind that you might not be attached to any terminal at all, eg. redirected to file).

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