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In the company I work for, we have the policy that all code should be reviewed before it is checked in into the SVN repository. Normally, before I commit, I just ask a collegue to review, but at this moment there is nobody around for a couple of days, and I have several tasks to do with the same class.

I installed git, and used git-svn to make a local repository. I committed every change I am going to propose after some time, and with git-svn dcommit, I can sync my stuff inside the master repository.

The question now is: what happens if my co-worker that will review my stuff in a few days disagrees with one commit, or wants me to make some additional changes (e.g. code comments)? How do I do that without having to do an extra commit, that will eventually show up in my SVN master repository?

Example, let's say - for the sake of understandibility - that I am working on one file.

  • SVN fetched rev 1000
  • Added code change A, git commit.
  • Added code change B, git commit.
  • Added code change C, git commit.

Now, my co-worker accepts changes A and C, but disagrees with change B, and wants more comments to go in along with change B. The result I want to end up with eventually is:

  • SVN rev 1001 - Code change A
  • SVN rev 1002 - Modified code change B + addtitional comments
  • SVN rev 1003 - Code change C.

I am not very familiar with git, and am quite familiar with SVN. How do I change the contributions I committed into code change B without making a fourth commit?

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"In the company I work for, we have the policy that all code should be reviewed before it is checked in into the SVN repository". Are you serious? This is the most absurd policy I've ever heard of! –  eckes Dec 8 '10 at 21:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off, you shouldn't need an additional VCS to perform code reviews at your company before committing to trunk. khmarbaise's answer is the right one. The proper (and sane) way to do this is to create a branch, make your changes in the branch, have your colleague check out that branch when you're done, review the code, commit remedial changes your branch, and then whoever has authority will merge your branch into trunk. This is basic VCS protocol. If this is not the way your company does it, it's a sure sign your company's Doing It Wrong when it comes to VCS.

If you absolutely must use an external tool because your company policy is inane, then to to address the following part of your question

Example, let's say - for the sake of understandibility - that I am working on one file.

  • SVN fetched rev 1000
  • Added code change A, git commit.
  • Added code change B, git commit.
  • Added code change C, git commit.

Now, my co-worker accepts changes A and C, but disagrees with change B, and wants more comments to go in along with change B. The result I want to end up with eventually is:

  • SVN rev 1001 - Code change A
  • SVN rev 1002 - Modified code change B + addtitional comments
  • SVN rev 1003 - Code change C.

I am not very familiar with git, and am quite familiar with SVN. How do I change the contributions I committed into code change B without making a fourth commit?

I don't even understand why you would want to avoid a fourth commit in the first place, if you're allowed to make three commits that affect one feature.

If you really, really are intent on going through with this whole idea, then yes, you can do it, and to do so, you would need to very carefully use git rebase --interactive. This powerful command can allow you to go back through your commits and completely alter the changes made in each one. I must emphasize that this has high potential for loss of work (or at least cost you significant time in recovery), and should only be done if you have a very firm knowledge of git itself.

But you really, really should be using SVN branching and merging to do all of this.

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there's always reflog for recovering from mis-rebases ;) but true, it can theoretically lead to data loss –  knittl Dec 8 '10 at 18:34
1  
I'd like to respectfully disagree that this is a ridiculously unreasonable idea. I find it incredibly powerful to use git for my own development since it provides tools git rebase -i to let me rework my code prior to review. You are correct to point out the risk of losing work, but my mixed environment gives me flexibility while developing and the "safety" of svn's centralized, immutable history when I finally decide to deliver my code. Just because I can't force my entire group into git doesn't mean I can't benefit from my own use of it. –  MikeSep Dec 8 '10 at 20:37
    
@knittl: True, I went to hyperbole in order to influence the OP's decision. I have updated my answer to be more honest. Thank you for the constructive comment. –  gotgenes Dec 8 '10 at 21:18
    
@MikeSep: This was my fault in not being explicit enough in my wording. I did not mean to imply using git svn nor git rebase -i is unreasonable (I love and use git svn every day and rebase -i occasionally for the very reasons you do); rather I meant to re-iterate that applying git to solve this scenario indicates a need to address a much more chronic underlying issue, which is an abominable VCS policy. I have edited the wording in my answer, since this was ambiguous. Thank you for pointing this out. –  gotgenes Dec 8 '10 at 21:24

Just create a branch and do commits on that branch. Let your coworker late review the code and then merge the code back to trunk (e.g.) or to an other branch.

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Do you mean a GIT branch or an SVN branch? SVN is not to be touched in any way when dealing with unreviewed code, so an SVN branch is not an option due to policy. –  Pelle ten Cate Dec 8 '10 at 16:25
    
@Pelle: He means an SVN branch. Are you certain you can not create a branch in your company's repository? This is exactly the purpose of a VCS. It is very reasonable to restrict commit privileges to trunk, but completely unreasonable to discourage, let alone restrict, creation of and committing to branches. –  gotgenes Dec 8 '10 at 17:35

The key is not to push your changes into svn until they are approved. Once you have run git svn dcommit, you lose the git's power to edit and reorder your commits. dcommit makes your changes public, and svn's history is (for the most part) immutable.

I usually make my changes in a branch and push them to a public git repository whose location I give to my code reviewers. I can then keep working on another project in a separate branch. Based on the feedback from the review, I can make changes to the branch in my working repository and republish for review, and when everything is ready, I do a final git svn dcommit to finalize my changes into svn.

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Use git svn clone <uri> to checkout the code in the SVN repository not git svn init. The <uri> should be the same path you would use if you did svn checkout <uri>. –  gotgenes Dec 8 '10 at 17:38
    
To take your local commits out of master, you want to first create a new branch at the current master (git branch myWork master), then repoint master to match git-svn or trunk (git branch -f master git-svn), depending on what type of git svn init/clone you originally did. There are also lots of examples of how to separate branches on the git rebase man page: kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-rebase.html –  MikeSep Dec 8 '10 at 20:32

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