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I need to be able to replace some common foreign characters with English equivalents before I store values into my db.

For example: æ replace with ae and ñ with n.

Do I use preg_replace?

Thanks

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1  
This is known as transliteration. –  Gumbo Dec 8 '10 at 16:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can define your convertable characters in an array, and use str_replace():

$conversions = array(
    "æ" => "ae",
    "ñ" => "n",
);

$text = str_replace(array_keys($conversions), $conversions, $text);
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For single character of accents

$str = strtr($str, 
  "ÀÁÂÃÄÅÇÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏÑÒÓÔÕÖØÝßàáâãäåçèéêëìíîïñòóôõöøùúûüýÿ",
  "AAAAAACEEEEIIIINOOOOOOYSaaaaaaceeeeiiiinoooooouuuuyy"); 

For double character of accents (such as Æ, æ)

$match   = array('æ', 'Æ');
$replace = array('ae', 'AE');
$str = str_replace($replace, $replace, $str);
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+1 for the character set (but I am missing some hungarian ones: ŐőŰű;) –  István Ujj-Mészáros Dec 8 '10 at 16:16

You can try iconv() with ASCII//TRANSLIT:

$text = iconv("UTF-8", "ASCII//TRANSLIT", $text);
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not going to work for æ to ae –  ajreal Dec 8 '10 at 15:59
    
@ajrael: This does convert 'æ' to 'ae', at least it did when I tried it just now. ideone.com/tBewx - Can you give a specific example showing how it doesn't work? –  Mark Byers Dec 15 '10 at 22:46
    
@Mark Doesn't work with ISO-8859-1//TRANSLIT. Edited to ASCII as in your working example. Thanks for your comment! –  István Ujj-Mészáros Dec 16 '10 at 7:48
    
Ah, I didn't see that difference! –  Mark Byers Dec 16 '10 at 8:31
    
this isn't working rather gives question marks ?? –  A Bright Worker Apr 1 '14 at 4:38

Excuse me second-guessing why you're doing this, but..

If this is for search matching: The point of character set collation in a MySQL (for example), is that you can search for "n" and still match "ñ"

IF this is for display purposes: I'd recommend if you have to do this, you do it when you display the text to a user. You can never get your original data back otherwise.

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