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Tried searching Google and Stackoverflow first, but couldn't come up with a simple answer for what I wanted to do. (Maybe my Google-Fu is weak. Who knows?) Anyway...

Say I have a table column that has results like:

ABC_blahblahblah
DEFGH_moreblahblahblah
IJKLMNOP_moremoremoremore

I would like to be able to write a query that selects this column from said table, but only returns the substring up to the Underscore (_) character. For example:

ABC
DEFGH
IJKLMNOP

The SUBSTRING function doesn't seem to be up to the task because it is position-based and the position of the underscore varies.

I thought about the TRIM function (the RTRIM function specifically):

SELECT RTRIM('listofchars' FROM somecolumn) 
FROM sometable

But I'm not sure how I'd get this to work since it only seems to remove a certain list/set of characters and I'm really only after the characters leading up to the Underscore character.

Thoughts?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Using a combination of SUBSTR and INSTR will return what you want:

SELECT SUBSTR('ABC_blahblahblah', 0, INSTR('ABC_blahblahblah', '_')-1) AS output
  FROM DUAL

Result:

output
------
ABC

Use:

SELECT SUBSTR(t.column, 0, INSTR(t.column, '_')-1) AS output
  FROM YOUR_TABLE t

Reference:

Addendum

If using Oracle10g+, you can use regex via REGEXP_SUBSTR.

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Thanks. Very elegant! (good to know about REGEXP_SUBSTR, too.) I didn't even think to look for Regex support in Oracle. –  Pretzel Dec 8 '10 at 16:26
    
In Oracle you can create functions (standalone or in a package) and use them in a select statement. –  bart Dec 8 '10 at 18:02
2  
Fails if run against values that do NOT contain the substring you're looking for. instr returns 0 if you have INSTR('ABC/D', '_'). In the end you have a substring from 0 to (0-1) which is null. Not good. –  Marcel Stör Nov 6 '12 at 20:40
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You need to get the position of the first underscore (using INSTR) and then get the part of the string from 1st charecter to (pos-1) using substr.

  1  select 'ABC_blahblahblah' test_string,
  2         instr('ABC_blahblahblah','_',1,1) position_underscore,
  3         substr('ABC_blahblahblah',1,instr('ABC_blahblahblah','_',1,1)-1) result
  4*   from dual
SQL> /

TEST_STRING      POSITION_UNDERSCORE RES
---------------- ------------------  ---
ABC_blahblahblah                  4  ABC

Instr documentation

Susbtr Documentation

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+1, for the good explanation. –  Pretzel Dec 8 '10 at 16:27
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Another possibility would be the use of REGEXP_SUBSTR.

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This can be done using REGEXP_SUBSTR easily.

Please use REGEXP_SUBSTR('STRING_EXAMPLE','[^_]+',1,1) where STRING_EXAMPLE is your string.

Try

SELECT REGEXP_SUBSTR('STRING_EXAMPLE','[^_]+',1,1)  from dual

it will solve your problem.

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Though the substr,instr conbination is a much better idea , easier , and have better performance ,still it won't hurt to know how to use the rtim function to get such result

what u need here is nested rtim function , so the inner "rtrim" will delete everything after the _ symbol , off-course to do so you will have to provide the "rtrim" with every single possible char in the string , then the outer "rtim" comes and deletes the _ symbol

So the solution would look something like this :

SELECT RTRIM ( RTRIM ('ABC_blahblahblah', ' abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789 \-!\&\<\>#+.,;/$?'' \\t') , '_' ) FROM dual ;

And as for your code it i will be :

SELECT RTRIM ( RTRIM (t.column , 'set of chars could possibly follow the _ symbol') , '_' ) FROM YOUR_TABLE t ;

regards

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