Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a recursive function which take an integer ,n, and give all the even number to zero and then every number to n...

this is what I have so far

def kaboom(n):
   if n>=0:
     if n%2==0:
           print n,
           print kaboom(n-2),
     else:
           n=n-1
           print n,
           print kaboom(n-2),
   print n,    
   n=n+1
   return n

the output is

kaboom(5)

4 2 0 None 0 1 2 3 4

5

kaboom(4)

4 2 0 None 0 1 2 3 4

5

but it should be

kaboom(5)

4 2 0 1 2 3 4 5

and

kaboom(4)

4 2 0 1 2 3 4

and by the way this is not homework :)

share|improve this question
    
format with the code button –  pastjean Dec 8 '10 at 16:08
    
No syntax highlighting, aww. –  Blender Dec 8 '10 at 16:09
    
can n be negative? –  lijie Dec 8 '10 at 16:10
    
no ... just positive –  user531225 Dec 8 '10 at 16:11
2  
That’s not the actual output. –  Josh Lee Dec 8 '10 at 16:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Print the even numbers on the way "down" through the recursion, and print each number on the way "back", reducing by 1 each time. Use , after the print statement to follow the number with a space instead of a newline. Don't return a value and don't print a returned value.

def kaboom(n):
    if (n % 2) == 0: print n,
    if n == 0: return # we "hit bottom"
    kaboom(n-1) # make the recursive call
    # From this point on, we are "on the way back", and print each value.
    print n,
share|improve this answer
    
thx :) karl .... –  user531225 Dec 8 '10 at 16:24
def kaboom(n):
    if n >= 0:
        if n%2 == 0:
            print n,
        kaboom (n-1)
    if n > 0:
        print n,

Test:

>>>  kaboom(4)
4 2 0 1 2 3 4
>>> kaboom(5)
4 2 0 1 2 3 4 5
share|improve this answer

Here is the itertools way to do it. No recursion:

from itertools import chain, imap
def even_down_all_up(x):
    return ' '.join(imap(str, chain(xrange(x-1 if x%2 else x, 0, -1), xrange(0, x+1))))

print even_down_all_up(5)
4 2 0 1 2 3 4 5

print even_down_all_up(4)
4 2 0 1 2 3 4

Iterator only version returning strings:

from itertools import chain, imap
def even_down_all_up(x):
    return imap(str, chain(xrange(x-1 if x%2 else x, 0, -1), xrange(0, x+1)))

print list(even_down_all_up(5))
['4', '2', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5']

print tuple(even_down_all_up(4))
('4', '2', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4')

Iterator version returning ints

from itertools import chain, imap
def even_down_all_up(x):
    return chain(xrange(x-1 if x%2 else x, 0, -1), xrange(0, x+1))

print tuple(even_down_all_up(4))
(4, 2, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4)

NOTE: I love stackoverflow for giving me questions to apply itertools to . :) EDIT: Added int returning version.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hi there, coming from the main comments :-) I guess you agree that there is no point in doing a recursion version of this. I had also written a very similar code, only that I had the first xrange this way: xrange(n & ~1, -1, -2). I'd say that the "int version" is probably enough, no need to map elements to string. –  tokland Dec 8 '10 at 20:00
    
+1 I really like your bitwise and with the complement of one. That is simple and clean, thx for sharing. –  kevpie Dec 8 '10 at 20:59

I think you need 2 recursive functions (in VB.Net because I don't know python) :

Function AllNumbers(ByVal n As Integer) As String
    If n > 0 Then
        Return AllNumbers(n - 1) & " " & n
    Else
        Return ""
    End If
End Function

Function EvenNumbers(ByVal n As Integer) As String
    If n > 0 Then
        If n Mod 2 = 0 Then
            Return n.ToString & " " & EvenNumbers(n - 2)
        Else
            Return EvenNumbers(n - 1)
        End If
    Else
        Return "0"
    End If
End Function

Function Kaboom(ByVal n As Integer) As String
    Return EvenNumbers(n) & AllNumbers(n)
End Function
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.