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In experimenting with this question I created an example that I utterly do not understand. In particular, it highlights my misunderstanding of pointers, references, and the boost::shared_ptr.

int& r = *(new int(0));//gratuitous pointer leak, got to initialize it to something
{
    boost::shared_ptr<int> sp(new int(100));
    r = *sp;
    cout << "r=" << r << endl;
}
cout << "r=" << r << endl << endl;

int* p;
{
    boost::shared_ptr<int> sp(new int(100));
    p = &*sp;
    cout << "*p=" << *p << endl;
}
cout << "*p=" << *p << endl;

Running this code gives an output something like this:

r=100
r=100

*p=100
*p=13

Why does the reference survive the death of the shared_ptr but the pointer does not?


There's a problem in the answers here in that there seem to be two diametrically opposed and contradictory solutions and no consensus upon which is the truth. I would like the ability to use a reference after a shared_ptr is deleted, but if it's invalid I really need to understand this.

Perhaps someone can post a simple example that demonstrates the undefined behavior in the reference.

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If I reverse the order of the blocks then still the reference survives, and the pointer does not. However you're saying that this is merely luck, right? –  JnBrymn Dec 8 '10 at 17:13
    
my comment was wrong, see @FredOverflow's answer. Sorry... –  Steve Townsend Dec 8 '10 at 17:18
    
Please don't write *(new ...). You're saying, in effect, "please allocate some memory from the heap, and then forget that the memory came from the heap". If you then assign to a value rather than a reference, you have an unrecoverable memory leak. Even assigning to the reference, cleaning up requires delete &r, which is horribly un-idiomatic. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 8 '10 at 17:21
    
@Karl, I don't think this matters when you are intentionally pointing out subtle differences between pointers and references. In production code a function like this would not exist in the first place. –  finnw Dec 8 '10 at 17:27
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Because r = *sp; does not do what you think it does. It assigns to the referent, that is, to the anonymous int object you created on the heap in line 1. You cannot reseat references in C++.

Here is what the standard says about evaluating reference expressions:

If an expression initially has the type "reference to T", the type is adjusted to T prior to any further analysis. The expression designates the object or function denoted by the reference, and the expression is an lvalue or an xvalue, depending on the expression.

So you see, there is no way to get to "the reference itself". It simply does not exist in C++.

Maybe this code will make it clearer:

int a = 42;
int b = 97;

int&r = a;   // r is just an alias (another name) for a
    r = b;   // assigns b to a (does NOT bind r to b, that's impossible in C++!)

After executing the last line, both a and b contain 97, because r = b really means a = b.

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so it's as if I'm coding something like this?: (&r)=(&*sp); –  JnBrymn Dec 8 '10 at 17:09
1  
No; it's as if you're coding... hold your breath... r = *sp. r is best thought of as a newly-assigned name for an already-existing value. You're reading the value pointed at by the shared pointer, and assigning it to the chunk of memory that r refers to. You are not causing r to refer to a different chunk of memory; that is impossible. r is a new name for a value. Values don't move (at least, not pre-0x). –  Karl Knechtel Dec 8 '10 at 17:24
    
@FredOverflow So then you're indicating that in my example it's ok to use the reference after the corresponding shared_ptr is deleted. I don't understand how a reference that references a deleted value can have defined behavior... although in my current case it would be helpful if it did. –  JnBrymn Dec 8 '10 at 17:34
    
@John: But the reference does not correspond to the shared_ptr at all! First, you create an anonymous object on the heap with the value 0. Let's just call that a. Then you create a different anonymous object on the heap with the value 100. Let's call that b. Then you give the responsibility of deleting b to a shared_ptr called sp. Then you assign the value of b to a. The reference r is still bound to a at this point. It still has no connection whatsoever with b. Then sp falls out of scope an deletes b, but a is not affected by this, and neither is r. –  FredOverflow Dec 8 '10 at 17:43
    
@FredOverflow ok, I think I get it now, so correct me if I'm still wrong. When I create a reference r, it is forever and always and irrevocably bound to (i.e. an alias of) the value at a certain address. You called this value a. When I have a statement such as r = b then what this really says is that a (and it's alias r) is now a copy of b (but not b itself). Thus whenever I delete b, a (and it's alias r) are unaffected. Sound right? –  JnBrymn Dec 8 '10 at 17:54
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p is undefined, r is a copy

int& r = *(new int(0));
{
    boost::shared_ptr<int> sp(new int(100));
    r = *sp; // copy
    cout << "r=" << r << endl;
}
cout << "r=" << r << endl << endl;

int* p;
{
    boost::shared_ptr<int> sp(new int(100));
    p = &*sp;
    cout << "*p=" << *p << endl;
}
cout << "*p=" << *p << endl; // Undefined, pointer points to deleted int
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If it keeps pointing to *(new int(0)), how can it print 100? –  ronag Dec 8 '10 at 17:11
    
@ronag: the value where the pointer points to was copied to where the reference points. –  Marcus Fritzsch Dec 8 '10 at 17:15
    
Thank you for correcting that. –  ronag Dec 8 '10 at 17:16
1  
It is referring (not pointing; it isn't a pointer) to the int that was allocated by new int(0). That int gets overwritten with 100. It works the same as if we had initialized the reference with a literal value e.g. int& r = 0;, which in turn works the same as if we had used a value instead of a reference e.g. int r = 0;. A reference simply associates an(other) name with a value. It should not be thought of as some kind of magical pseudo-pointer, because by the time you've added enough explanation of how it differs from a pointer, you really don't understand what is going on any more. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 8 '10 at 17:17
    
@Karl: int& r = 0 does not compile though, because you cannot bind lvalue references to rvalues ;) –  FredOverflow Dec 8 '10 at 18:03
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In the second case, your int-object is destructed. In the first case it is not.

In the first case, you create a new int-object with new in the outer scope. In the inner scope, you create a second int-object, for which you also create a shared_ptr, which then owns the int-object. This shared_ptr runs out of scope when you close the inner scope, it therefore gets destructed. The shared_ptr destructor will also destruct the object it refers to, because no other shared_ptr (that was created from the original one) refers to your int object anymore. That's all alright. However, in the middle of that scope you re-assign the value of r to that of *sp (100). You therefore save the value of *sp, before sp gets destructed, into r.

Note: it's certainly questionable style to create an int object the way you do it in your first line of code. If you don't explicitly delete that int object, this is a memory leek. The way to destruct it would be delete &r which looks really ugly, especially because the symbol r afterwards still refers to the, now deleted, int object. DON'T DO THIS!

In the second case you create an int pointer at the beginning, but no int object. The inner scope is almost the same as before, except that this time you do not save the value of your new int object into the outer-scope variable (p), but you save the address of the int object! As the int object gets destructed at the end of the inner scope (for the same reason as previously), p no longer points to an existing int object, but to a place in memory which formerly once hold an int object. The value you get from *p is undefined: you might still get 100, you could get any other value, and you might even crash your programme here (Segmentation fault) as you dereference a memory location you no longer hold.

So to summarise, and answer your final question:

The reference survives, because it still refers to an existing object. The pointer does not, because it points to a no longer existing object.

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