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I was reading an article linked from a slashdot story, and came across this little tidbit:

Take the latest version of Java, which tries to make null-pointer checking easier by offering shorthand syntax for the endless pointer testing. Just adding a question mark to each method invocation automatically includes a test for null pointers, replacing a rat's nest of if-then statements, such as:

    public String getPostcode(Person person) {
      String ans= null;
      if (person != null) {
        Name nm= person.getName();
        if (nm!= null) {
          ans= nm.getPostcode();
        }
      }
      return ans
    } 

With this:

public String getFirstName(Person person) {
      return person?.getName()?.getGivenName();
    } 

I've scoured the internet (okay, I spent at least 15 minutes googling variations on "java question mark") and got nothing. So, my question: is there any official documentation on this? I found that C# has a similar operator (the "??" operator), but I'd like to get the documentation for the language I'm working in. Or, is this just a use of the ternary operator that I've never seen before.

Thanks!

EDIT: Link to the article: http://infoworld.com/d/developer-world/12-programming-mistakes-avoid-292

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3  
Could we have a link to the article at least? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 8 '10 at 17:03
    
And the source of the snippet? –  khachik Dec 8 '10 at 17:05
4  
The article is wrong. infoworld.com/print/145292 I believe a Project Coin submission was submitted for it. But it wasn't selected (for reasons mentioned in the article - if you want to do that sort of thing, use C# or something), and certainly isn't in the current version of the Java language. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 8 '10 at 17:05
1  
That's not the same as the C# ?? operator: ?? coalesces nulls, i.e. A ?? B == (A != null) ? A : B. This appears to evaluate a property on an object if the object reference is not null, i.e. A?.B == (A != null) ? A.B : null. –  Rup Dec 8 '10 at 17:07
1  
@Erty: as a huge user of the @NotNull annotation, which is basically everywhere in the code I write, I don't know very well anymore what NPEs are (except when using badly desing APIs). Yet I find this "shortcut notation" cute and interesting. Of course the article is right when it states: After all, it doesn't eliminate the root of the problem: the proliferation of null values due to fast and loose programming. 'null' doesn't exist at the OOA/OOD level. It's another Java-idiosynchratic nonsense that can mostly be worked around. To me it's @NotNull everywhere. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 8 '10 at 17:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The original idea comes from groovy. It was proposed for Java 7 as part of Project Coin: https://wikis.oracle.com/display/ProjectCoin/2009ProposalsTOC, (Elvis and Other Null-Safe Operators) but hasn't been accepted yet.

The related Elvis operator ?: was proposed to make x ?: y shorthand for x != null ? x : y, especially useful when x is a complex expression.

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4  
"Elvis"? I don't see it... –  Karl Knechtel Dec 8 '10 at 17:12
1  
In java (where there's no auto-coercion to null) a shorthand for x!=null ? x : y –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 8 '10 at 17:12
4  
@Karl: turn it right 90 degrees, like a :-) smilie. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 8 '10 at 17:14
23  
? is Elvis Presley's signature quiff; the : just represents a pair of eyes as usual. Perhaps ?:-o is more evocative... –  Andrzej Doyle Dec 8 '10 at 17:34
3  
?:0 Should be a "Not null, nor 0" operator. Make it so. –  Der Flatulator Apr 15 '13 at 8:55

This syntax does not exist in Java, nor is it slated to be included in any of the upcoming versions that I know of.

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2  
Why the downvote? This answer is 100% correct as far as I know... if you know something different, please say so. –  ColinD Dec 8 '10 at 17:05
    
but obviously at one point it has been submitted (see Tom Hawtin's comments) and will maybe make it into the language. So a "This syntax does not exist yet in Java" would be more appropriate. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 8 '10 at 17:11
1  
@Webinator: It's not going to be in Java 7 or 8, and there are no other "upcoming versions" at this time. I also find it kind of unlikely that it will make it in, since it encourages rather bad practices. I also don't think "yet" is necessary, since "does not exist in Java" is not the same as "will never exist in Java". –  ColinD Dec 8 '10 at 17:12
4  
@Webinator: several posters have commented that a proposal was submitted but rejected. Thus the answer is 100% accurate. Upvoting to counteract the down vote. –  JeremyP Dec 8 '10 at 17:16

There was a proposal for it in Java 7, but it was rejected:

http://tech.puredanger.com/java7/#null

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See: http://blogs.oracle.com/darcy/entry/project_coin_final_five (specifically "Elvis and other null safe operators").

The result is that this feature was considered for Java 7, but was not included.

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That's actually Groovy's safe-dereference operator. You can't use it in pure Java (sadly), so that post is simply wrong (or more likely slightly misleading, if it's claiming Groovy to be the "latest version of Java").

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So the article was wrong - the syntax doesn't exist in native java. Hmm. –  Erty Dec 8 '10 at 17:07

I'm not sure this would even work; if, say, the person reference was null, what would the runtime replace it with? A new Person? That would require the Person to have some default initialization that you'd expect in this case. You may avoid null reference exceptions but you'd still get unpredictable behavior if you didn't plan for these types of setups.

The ?? operator in C# might be best termed the "coalesce" operator; you can chain several expressions and it will return the first that isn't null. Unfortunately, Java doesn't have it. I think the best you could do is use the ternary operator to perform null checks and evaluate an alternative to the entire expression if any member in the chain is null:

return person == null ? "" 
    : person.getName() == null ? "" 
        : person.getName().getGivenName();

You could also use try-catch:

try
{
   return person.getName().getGivenName();
}
catch(NullReferenceException)
{
   return "";
}
share|improve this answer
    
"what would the runtime replace it with?" ... reading the question might help :-P It would replace it with null. In general, the idea seems to be that person?.getName evaluates to null if person is null or to person.getName if not. So it's pretty much like replacing "" with null in all your examples. –  subsub Feb 4 '13 at 15:35
    
A NullReferenceException could also been thrown in getName() or getGivenName() which you won't know if you simply return an empty string for all occurrences. –  Jimmy T. Dec 14 '13 at 23:32

There you have it, null-safe invocation in Java 8:

public void someMethod() {
    String userName = nullIfAbsent(new Order(), t -> t.getAccount().getUser()
        .getName());
}

static <T, R> R nullIfAbsent(T t, Function<T, R> funct) {
    try {
        return funct.apply(t);
    } catch (NullPointerException e) {
        return null;
    }
}
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I will have to try this. SI have serious doubts about this whole "Optional" business. Seems like a nasty hack. –  GGB667 Jun 5 at 17:49
    
The whole purpose of the Elvis Operator proposal was to do this in one line. This approach is no better than the "if(!=null) approach above. In fact I would argue it is worse as it is not a straight forward. Additionally you should avoid throwing and catching errors due to the overhead. –  JustinKSU Oct 17 at 13:22

If this is not a performance issue for you, you can write

public String getFirstName(Person person) {
  try {
     return person.getName().getGivenName();
  } catch (NullPointerException ignored) {
     return null;
  }
} 
share|improve this answer
4  
The problem with this style is that the NullPointerException may not have come from where you expected it to. And thus it may hide a real bug. –  Darron Dec 8 '10 at 18:25
1  
@Darron, Can you give an example of a getter you have written which could throw an NPE and how you would want to handle it differently? –  Peter Lawrey Dec 8 '10 at 20:29
2  
you run it into a separate variable and test it with an if as normal. The idea behind this operator is to eliminate that uglyness. Darron is right, your solution might hide and throw away exceptions you want to throw. Such as if getName() threw an exception internally that you do not want to throw away. –  Mike Miller Dec 9 '10 at 19:27
1  
Not any exception, it would have to be a NullPointerException. You are trying to protect yourself from a situation you haven't begun to explain how it might occur in a real application. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 10 '10 at 9:36
    
In a real application Person could be a proxy accessing a DB or some non-heap memory and there could be a bug somewhere... Not very realistic, but, Peter, I'd bet you've never written a piece of code like above. –  maaartinus Apr 16 at 13:15

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