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I have two tables - CALL and ACTIONS_HISTORY - where ACTIONS_HISTORY contains actions relevant to each CALL. There won't always be an action for each call.

I want to select the most recent action for each call I have. Here's my current SQL:

    SELECT CALL.CALL_ID,
           ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID
      FROM ACTIONS_HISTORY
RIGHT JOIN CALL ON ACTIONS_HISTORY.CALL_ID = CALL.CALL_ID
  GROUP BY CALL.CALL_ID, ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID

This SQL also returns the same result:

    SELECT DISTINCT
           CALL.CALL_ID,
           ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID
      FROM ACTIONS_HISTORY
RIGHT JOIN CALL ON ACTIONS_HISTORY.CALL_ID = CALL.CALL_ID

For some reason this doesn't remove any extra rows, for example one call returns two instances as it has two relevant actions. What's the obvious mistake I'm making?

Edit: This code worked for a bit but now returns duplicate rows (not sure what the error is)

SELECT
    MAX(ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID) ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID,
    CALL.CALL_ID,
    DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION
FROM ACTIONS_HISTORY
RIGHT OUTER JOIN CALL ON ACTIONS_HISTORY.CALL_ID = CALL.CALL_ID
GROUP BY CALL.CALL_ID, DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION
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How do you determine what is most recent? Do you have an action_date column? Or can we determine this by ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID (larger nr = more recent)? –  Ronnis Dec 8 '10 at 17:29
    
ACTIONS_HISTORY_DT contains the date/time of the event. It could be done using the ID however as it is incremental. –  Ross Dec 8 '10 at 17:35
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5 Answers

As Donnie suggested, GROUP BY is for aggregation. You need to use an aggregate function in your SELECT clause, e.g.

SELECT
    CALL.CALL_ID,
    MAX(ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID) ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID
...

This would achieve your goal if your IDs are monotonically increasing.

EDIT: And you should then only group by CALL_ID

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This worked! Thanks so much –  Ross Dec 8 '10 at 17:27
    
I seem to have broken it again. It is still returning duplicate rows (updated question) –  Ross Dec 8 '10 at 17:34
3  
You need to understand how grouping and aggregation work instead of blindly making random changes and hoping for the best. Your current query returns the max action id for every combination of call id and action description, which, of course, would be every action, not just the most recent one. –  Donnie Dec 8 '10 at 18:23
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group by is for aggregation, not removing duplicates. If you want to remove dupes, use distinct.

For getting the max you need to explicitly request it using the max aggregate. In this case you're also not grouping by both columns. If your data does increase with time in a predictable way it is likely that you'll need a more complex query to get what you want.

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I tried this but it gave the same result (I'll amend my question to show the query I tried) –  Ross Dec 8 '10 at 17:23
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I have no Oracle installation on this computer, so I can't test, but the following should work. You would get each call, and the most recent action (have the highest date). I think that rn will be 1 even for calls without actions, but you have to test.

with ranked as(
    SELECT CALL.CALL_ID
          ,ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID
          ,row_number() over(partition by CALL.CALL_ID 
                                 order by ACTIONS_HISTORY_DT desc) as rn
      FROM ACTIONS_HISTORY
    RIGHT JOIN CALL ON ACTIONS_HISTORY.CALL_ID = CALL.CALL_ID
)
select *
  from ranked
 where rn = 1;
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While others have mentioned using MAX() with an increasing sequence, it's better practice avoid that if possible. Since you have ACTIONS_HISTORY_DT with an actual date value, that's a better candidate to use (and an index on this column will help performance).

Using MAX() with the sequence could break the query in some circumstances beyond a developer's control (e.g. moving to a clustered database) when the sequences are no longer technically in ascending order.

Additionally, you can use analytical functions to reduce the need for self-joins here as well. See About SQL Functions: Analytic Functions and FIRST_VALUE on oracle.com for more information.

I'd suggest this query:

  WITH recent_actions AS
      (SELECT DISTINCT ah.call_id,
         FIRST_VALUE(ah.actions_history_id) OVER 
          (PARTITION BY ah.call_id 
           ORDER BY ah.actions_history_dt DESC ROWS UNBOUNDED PRECEDING
          ) AS latest_action_id
       FROM actions_history ah)
   SELECT c.call_id, r.latest_action_id
     FROM call c
LEFT JOIN recent_actions r ON(r.call_id = c.call_id);

Because the query uses a common table expression (CTE) to pull out the CALL_ID and the latest ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID, you can use those ids to add another outer join to ACTIONS_HISTORY if you need more columns from the history returned in the query:

  WITH recent_actions AS
      (SELECT DISTINCT ah.call_id,
         FIRST_VALUE(ah.actions_history_id) OVER 
          (PARTITION BY ah.call_id 
           ORDER BY ah.actions_history_dt DESC ROWS UNBOUNDED PRECEDING
          ) AS latest_action_id
       FROM actions_history ah)
   SELECT c.call_id, r.latest_action_id, h.description, h.duration, h.caller_id
     FROM call c
LEFT JOIN recent_actions r ON(r.call_id = c.call_id)
LEFT JOIN actions_history h ON(h.actions_history_id = r.latest_action_id;
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I think you are looking for max() keep (dense_rank...)

with ACTIONS_HISTORY as(
        select 1  call_id  , 1 ACTIONS_HISTORY_id, 'found' DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION from dual
        union
        select 1  call_id  , 2 ACTIONS_HISTORY_id, 'lost' DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION from dual
        union
        select 2  call_id  , 3 ACTIONS_HISTORY_id, 'green' DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION from dual
        union
        select 2  call_id  , 4 ACTIONS_HISTORY_id, 'red' DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION from dual
        union
        select 3  call_id  , 5 ACTIONS_HISTORY_id, 'delta' DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION from dual

) ,
"CALL" as(
        select 1 call_id  from dual
        union
        select 2 call_id  from dual
        union
        select 3 call_id  from dual
)
    SELECT 
           "CALL".CALL_ID,
              max(DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION) keep (dense_rank last order by ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID) DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION ,
           max(ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID ) max_ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID 
      FROM ACTIONS_HISTORY
           RIGHT JOIN "CALL" 
              ON ACTIONS_HISTORY.CALL_ID = "CALL".CALL_ID
        group by "CALL".CALL_ID;


CALL_ID                DESCRIPTION_OF_ACTION MAX_ACTIONS_HISTORY_ID 
---------------------- --------------------- ---------------------- 
1                      lost                  2                      
2                      red                   4                      
3                      delta                 5  
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