Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to achieve:

select StoreId, StoreName from Store where StoreId in (
     select StoreId from Employee where EmployeeName = 'Steve Jobs')

I have this code:

public class Store
{
  public virtual int StoreId { get; private set; }
  public virtual string StoreName { get; set; }

  public virtual IList<Employee> Staff { get; set; }
}

public class Employee
{
  public virtual Store Store { get; set; }

  public virtual int EmployeeId { get; private set; }
  public virtual string EmployeeName { get; set; }
}



var q = from s in session.Query<Store>()
        where 
            (from e in session.Query<Employee>()
            where s.EmployeeName == "Steve Jobs"
            select e.Store.StoreId).Contains(s.StoreId)
        select s;

NHibernate generates this (aliases stripped):

    select s.StoreId, s.StoreName
    from Store s
    where exists
        (
            select t.StoreId
            from Employee e
            left join Store t on t.StoreId = e.StoreId
            where e.EmployeeName = 'Steve Jobs'

                -- wrongly generated code
                and t.EmployeeId = s.StoreId 

        )

Linq-toSql generates the code correctly:

    select s.StoreId, s.StoreName
    from Store s
    where exists
        (
            select null
            from Employee e
            where e.EmployeeName = 'Steve Jobs'                        
                and e.StoreId = s.StoreId 

        )

Is there a problem with subquery code generation on Linq to NHibernate?

However, HQL works:

var q = session.CreateQuery("from Store as s where s.StoreId in (select e.WorkingInStore.StoreId from Employee as e where e.EmployeeName = 'lennon')").List<Store>();
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Certainly looks like a bug, but I think you're overcomplicating the whole query. As I understand, you want all stores where an employee named Steve Jobs is on the payroll. Try:

var q = from s in session.Query<Store>()
        where s.Staff.Any(e=>e.EmployeeName == "Steve Jobs")

This should generate the query you want, and it's much cleaner and more readable than the subquery.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, I should have thought of that, I've used ANY in SQL before, or maybe I'm attempting it too much in a very Linq-y approach first and inspired by this blog.wekeroad.com/2008/02/27/…, avoiding lambda and extension methods if at all possible. But on this case, .Any looks more elegant than pure Linq approach, and not all SQL concept can be captured in Linq syntax, extension method is warranted, .Distinct() comes to mind, ienablemuch.com/2010/12/… –  Michael Buen Dec 8 '10 at 23:30
    
However, I hope Linq NHibernate team will fix the bug. Linq chaining is not only neat, it promotes code reuse too blog.wekeroad.com/2008/02/27/… –  Michael Buen Dec 8 '10 at 23:37

I answered a similar question in this post. Instead of using Contains() operator, we can tweak the subquery a little bit and use Any() operator instead.

LINQ to NHibernate WHERE EXISTS IN

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.