Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I have

template <class T>
class A
{
 static void f()
 {
  //no any using of template parameter T
 }
};

in this case A<int>::f() is same as A<double>::f() but I don't want call A::f() via template parameter. So is there syntax that allows calling of f() but doesn't requires template parameter?

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

The compiler doesn't know that A<T>::f() doesn't use type parameter T. So as it is, you must give the compiler a type any time you use f.

But when I'm designing a template class and I notice some members/methods don't depend on template parameters, I'll often move those up to a non-template base class.

class A_Base {
public:
  static void f();
};

template <class T> class A : public A_Base {
  // ...
};

Now A_Base::f(), A<int>::f(), and A<double>::f() really are all the same thing.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for neat workaround. Though the compiler should be able to know if it uses the parameter T -- if there aren't any instances of the identifier T in the code then it's certainly not being used. – Billy ONeal Dec 8 '10 at 17:45
    
@Billy: But if the class is part of a public library, then introducing usage of the T parameter would cause an ABI-breaking change, since A::f() would no longer be valid. The introduction of content into functions should never, ever break ABI, only changes in the function definition. – cdhowie Dec 8 '10 at 17:51
    
@Billy ONeal: Yes, except when f() calls some A<T>::g() which does depend on T. However, since the general rule is that anything regarding use of an identifier should depend on its declaration only, the language doesn't equate f<T>() with f() even though T is not used in the body of f<T>. – jpalecek Dec 8 '10 at 17:56
    
+1 for class structure. Now code of f() won't be copied to all template specializations. – Pawel Zubrycki Dec 8 '10 at 18:11

No -- if you don't want to use a template argument, don't declare the class with a template parameter. If you need the template argument for other members of the class, but don't need it in f, then move f out of the class.

share|improve this answer
  1. There is no syntax for specifying that. There's little reason to make f a static method anyway. Make it a free function instead. If you must make it a static method for some reason, implement it in terms of a free function and merely call it.
  2. Many compilers will probably do this for you automatically.
share|improve this answer
    
I can't use free static function, because this is not my code I'm just using already written API. Thanks a lot for answer :) – Mihran Hovsepyan Dec 8 '10 at 17:48
    
@Mihran: Huh? How can an API care about a static method? sigh (BILL SMASH STRANGE API! :) ) – Billy ONeal Dec 8 '10 at 17:52

Sure. Give it an alias by assigning it to a function pointer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Of course, you'll still need to "use" a specific type to initialize that pointer, like typedef void (*func_ptr)(); func_ptr A_f = &A<int>::f; – aschepler Dec 8 '10 at 17:50

No, actually A<int>::f() is not the same of A<any_other_type>::f(). They are really different. If you want f() to be really independent of the parameter, you can make the template class A to inherit from another class (called sometimes a trait) that offers f() as a static member function:

struct X
{
  static void f() { ...}
};

template <typename T>
struct A : X
{
  ...

Then, you can call either A<type>::f() or X::f().

share|improve this answer

A cludgy work around (if you don't want to use inheritance and you don't want to make it a non-member function), you could specify a default type for your class:

template <class T = bool>
class A
{
  public:
   static void f() { cout << "f()" <<  endl; }
};

int main(void)
{
  A<>::f();
  return 0;
}

NOTE: this method however is not the same as, A<int>::f() or A<long>::f() etc. but if you have no type dependency in the function - then the above could work...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.