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I have a complex "Dot" in WPF which I need to customize the diameter.

alt text

The control code sample:

<UserControl>
    <Canvas>
        <Canvas.RenderTransform>
            <TranslateTransform X="-6" Y="-6"/>
        </Canvas.RenderTransform>
        <Ellipse Width="12" Height="12" x:Name="BigCircle" Fill="Red"/>
        <Ellipse Width="8" Height="8" x:Name="MediumCircle" Fill="Green" Canvas.Left="2" Canvas.Top="2"/>
        <Ellipse Width="4" Height="4" x:Name="SmallCircle" Fill="Blue" Canvas.Left="4" Canvas.Top="4" />
    </Canvas>
</UserControl>

What I want to achieve:

<UserControl>
    <UserControl.Resources>
        <sys:Double x:Key="dd">120</sys:Double>
    </UserControl.Resources>
    <Canvas>
        <Canvas.RenderTransform>
            <TranslateTransform X="-dd/2" Y="-dd/2"/>
        </Canvas.RenderTransform>
        <Ellipse Width="{DynamicResource ResourceKey=dd}" Height="{DynamicResource ResourceKey=dd}" x:Name="BigCircle" Fill="Red"/>
        <Ellipse Width="dd*2/3" Height="dd*2/3" x:Name="MediumCircle" Fill="Green" Canvas.Left="dd/6" Canvas.Top="dd/6"/>
        <Ellipse Width="dd/3" Height="dd/3" x:Name="SmallCircle" Fill="Blue" Canvas.Left="dd/3" Canvas.Top="dd/3" />
    </Canvas>
</UserControl>

every time I change "dd" then I want that my circles proportionally changes.

Using Converters

[ValueConversion(typeof(double), typeof(double))]
public class LargeToMediumConverter : IValueConverter 
{

    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return ((double)value * 2) / 3;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
/*  XAML */
<UserControl.Resources>
    <sys:Double x:Key="DotDiameter">12</sys:Double>
</UserControl.Resources>
...
<Ellipse Width="{Binding ElementName=DotDiameter}" Height="{Binding ElementName=DotDiameter}" x:Name="LargeCircle" ...
...

so this does not work....

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need a BindingConverter. Check out the following tutorial for more details.
You cant bind to mathematical expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
So, in the described case I need 3 converters for my point. In other words, I need as much converters how many dependent variables I have? –  serhio Dec 10 '10 at 9:57
    
Nope, you can use a ConverterParameter. So write one Converter and parametrize it. You also do not need multiple instances –  Jaster Dec 10 '10 at 10:16
    
Yes, but this is the hard way. WPF can do the layout itself with no need for any code at all. See my answer for details. –  Ray Burns Dec 10 '10 at 22:00

Wow! You all are working way too hard. WPF can do your layout for you, and easily too.

This will do exactly what you are looking for with no converters or other code of any kind:

<UserControl>
  <UserControl.Resources>
    <sys:Double x:Key="dd">120</sys:Double>
  </UserControl.Resources>
  <Canvas>
    <Grid Width="2000000" Height="2000000" RenderTransform="1 0 0 1 -1000000 -1000000">
      <Viewbox Width="{DynamicResource dd}" Height="{DynamicResource dd}" VerticalAlignment="Center" HorizontalAlignment="Center">
        <Grid Width="12" Height="12">
          <Ellipse Width="12" Height="12" Fill="Red" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center"/>
          <Ellipse Width="8" Height="8" Fill="Green" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center"/>
          <Ellipse Width="4" Height="4" Fill="Blue" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center"/>
        </Grid>
      </Viewbox>
    </Grid>
  </Canvas>
</UserControl>

This is only one of many ways to do it.

How it works

  • The inner Grid and its three Ellipses are all in a fixed size and position.
  • The Viewbox resizes the bulls-eye to the desired size.
  • The outer Grid centers the bulls-eye at (0,0). This is a convenient idiom for centering: Create a grid 2-million square, center the object in the grid, and then transform it by 1-million to the center.
  • The Canvas prevents clipping.

Note that the bulls-eye can also easily be done with a Drawing: Just replace the Viewbox with a Rectangle whose Fill brush is the drawing of the bulls-eye. Using a Drawing would be more efficient but less flexible (no ability to animate the ellipses, etc).

Converters have their place, but it is usually best to let WPF do the layout for you, especially in simple cases like this. Even in complex cases I recommend people write a Panel that does their custom layout instead of using converters.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 from me for the better solution. I have one question though: I have never seen that 2 Million square stuff before. I usually would instead set a Margin of minus half width and height. I assume you are using these high values because you assume its content is never going to get that big. Now if I combine your way with mine, do you see any problems with setting <Grid Width="2000000" Height="2000000" Margin="-1000000"> ? –  Markus Hütter Mar 25 '11 at 9:32
    
I think using Margin is an improvement over using RenderTransform. I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work. –  Ray Burns Mar 26 '11 at 6:24
    
You just turned my brain inside out. Gonna have to take the time to understand thoroughly why this actually WORKS, because it saved me a LOT of converter madness... –  heltonbiker Apr 17 '14 at 13:56

A Converter is an option. The expression converter in my WPF converters library will allow you to calculate values based on an expression:

<sys:Double x:Key="OuterWidth">120</sys:Double>

...

<Ellipse Width="{StaticResource OuterWidth}" .../>
<Ellipse Width="{Binding Source={StaticResource OuterWidth}, Converter={kb:ExpressionConverter 2/3*{0}}}" .../>
<Ellipse Width="{Binding Source={StaticResource OuterWidth}, Converter={kb:ExpressionConverter 1/3*{0}}}" .../>

Another option, if you're doing MVVM, is to just expose separate properties from your view model - one for the width of each ellipse. Then bind to them in your view:

<Ellipse Width="{Binding LargeWidth}" .../>
<Ellipse Width="{Binding MediumWidth}" .../>
<Ellipse Width="{Binding SmallWidth}" .../>
share|improve this answer
    
that's pretty spiffy. –  Ashley Grenon Dec 8 '10 at 18:07
    
without using third part libraries, don't understand the second option. First of all, the "dot" logically is an "atomic" Unit, so Large, Medium and Small widths can't be randomly assigned. The only "external" property is the "LargeWidth" all others are strictly dependent on it. –  serhio Dec 8 '10 at 18:18
    
No third-party involved. Create a class that implements INotifyPropertyChanged and exposes LargeWidth, MediumWidth, and SmallWidth properties that it recalculates when its OuterWidth property changes. Put the calculations in the class. Create an instance of the class, put it in the resource dictionary, and bind to it. –  Robert Rossney Dec 8 '10 at 18:54
    
@serhio: in addition to what Robert said, you may want to do some reading into MVVM. –  Kent Boogaart Dec 8 '10 at 21:05
    
@Robert Rossney: that didn't work. –  serhio Dec 10 '10 at 9:58

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