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This is the C# code I use:

public void Decrypt(byte[] @in, byte[] @out, int size)
{
    lock (this)
    {
        for (ushort i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            if (_server)
            {
                @out[i] = (byte)(@in[i] ^ 0xAB);
                @out[i] = (byte)((@out[i] << 4) | (@out[i] >> 4));
                @out[i] = (byte)(ConquerKeys.Key2[_inCounter >> 8] ^ @out[i]);
                @out[i] = (byte)(ConquerKeys.Key1[_inCounter & 0xFF] ^ @out[i]);
            }
            else
            {
                @out[i] = (byte)(ConquerKeys.Key1[_inCounter & 0xFF] ^ @in[i]);
                @out[i] = (byte)(ConquerKeys.Key2[_inCounter >> 8] ^ @out[i]);
                @out[i] = (byte)((@out[i] << 4) | (@out[i] >> 4));
                @out[i] = (byte)(@out[i] ^ 0xAB);
            }
            _inCounter = (ushort)(_inCounter + 1);
        }
    }
}

and this is how I converted it to work in C.

char* decrypt(char* in, int size, int server)
{
    char out[size];
    memset(out, 0, size);
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        if (server == 1)
        {
            out[i] = in[i] ^ 0xAB;
            out[i] = out[i] << 4 | out[i] >> 4;
            out[i] = Key2[incounter >> 8] ^ out[i];
            out[i] = Key1[incounter & 0xFF] ^ in[i];
        }
        else if (server == 0)
        {
            out[i] = Key1[incounter & 0xFF] ^ in[i];
            out[i] = Key2[incounter >> 8] ^ out[i];
            out[i] = out[i] << 4 | out[i] >> 4;
            out[i] = out[i] ^ 0xAB;
        }
        incounter++;
    }
    return out;
}

However for some reason the C one does not work.

Link for the full C# file

Link for the full C file

Link for the C implementation

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2  
It looks like the C# source was ported from C. Oh, how fun! A game of telephone! –  cdhowie Dec 8 '10 at 17:53
    
Do you have unit-tests? –  khachik Dec 8 '10 at 17:53
    
@khachik, no I don't. –  Basser Dec 8 '10 at 17:54
3  
What if (server == 2) ? if(server) is valid C code as well. This is probably not the origin of your problem, but it strikes me as odd. –  Xavier T. Dec 8 '10 at 17:54
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There was a translation error.

The C# line:

@out[i] = (byte)(ConquerKeys.Key1[_inCounter & 0xFF] ^ @out[i]);

Became:

out[i] = Key1[incounter & 0xFF] ^ in[i];

The value on the right of the xor (^) is from the wrong array.

Additionally, you are returning a stack-allocated variable, which will cause all sorts of problem.

Change:

char out[size];
memset(out, 0, size);

to:

char *out = (char*)calloc(size, sizeof(char));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! I should've found that out myself.. been looking for over an hour. Sorry for bothering all of you.. –  Basser Dec 8 '10 at 18:05
    
No problem. When you've been staring at the same piece of code for that long, it's easy to become blind to that sort of error. Fresh eyes always help. –  jtdubs Dec 8 '10 at 18:07
    
Actually, I just found out this didn't fix it. It made it appear to be correct. But it still isn't working. :/ –  Basser Dec 8 '10 at 18:47

The most glaring error I see is that you are returning a pointer to a stack-allocated array, which is going to get stomped by the next function call after decrypt() returns. You need to malloc() that buffer or pass in a pointer to a writable buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you help me out by using an example? This is the first project involving unmanaged code. :/ –  Basser Dec 8 '10 at 17:57
1  
Sure. Replace char out[size]; with char *out = (char*)malloc(size * sizeof(char));. Note that the code that calls decrypt() will be responsible for free()ing the memory when it is finished with it. –  cdhowie Dec 8 '10 at 17:59
    
@cdhowie, still not working... I edited my original post and added my implementation. –  Basser Dec 8 '10 at 18:00
    
Why not just pass out as a parameter the same way that you do in the C# code? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 8 '10 at 18:34
    
What difference would that make? –  Basser Dec 8 '10 at 18:49

You are returning a reference to a local variable which is illegal. Either let the caller pass in an array or use malloc() to create an array inside the method.

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2  
No, returning a local variable is not illegal. Returning a pointer to a stack-allocated variable is illegal. (Or, at the very least, undefined behavior.) Also, note the difference between "local" and "stack-allocated" -- the former includes function-scoped static variables; the latter does not. –  cdhowie Dec 8 '10 at 17:55

I also suggest turning char into unsigned char since it is more portable. If your platform assumes char is the same as signed char, the arithmetic (bit shifts, etc) will not work right.
So just specify unsigned char explicitly (use a typedef or include <stdint.h> if unsigned char seems too long-winded for you).

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