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I get three values from three variables. How can i check who is the highest number and who is the lowest number?

The numbers are represented like this:

private int _score1; 
private int _score2; 
private int _score2; 

Code:

Public int Highest
{
  return the highest number here;
}

public int Lowest
{
  return the lowest number here;
}

Can i calculate the highest and the lowest number in my constructor?

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1  
2 int with same name ? _score2? Public? Functions without () ? your constructor? –  user415789 Dec 8 '10 at 18:10
1  
So where is the problem? –  codymanix Dec 8 '10 at 18:10
6  
If this is homework, please tag appropriately. –  Bruno Brant Dec 8 '10 at 18:11
1  
Also, Highest and Lowest are properties? I see no constructor there... –  Bruno Brant Dec 8 '10 at 18:12
1  
@HPT Its not possible he has _score2 twice in his constuctor because it wouldn't compile. This almost sounds like a homework question. I will give him a few minutes to update his question he can tag his question and provide more details. @Bruno - He didn't past the entire class, Highest and Lowest are pseudo-code. –  Ramhound Dec 8 '10 at 18:13

9 Answers 9

The obligatory Linq answer:

Public int Highest(params int[] inputs)
{
  return inputs.Max();
}

public int Lowest(params int[] inputs)
{
  return inputs.Min();
}

The beauty of this one is that it can take any number of integer inputs. To make it fail-safe you should check for a null/empty inputs array (meaning nothing was passed into the method).

To do this without Linq, you basically just have to mimic the logic performed by the extension method:

Public int Lowest(params int[] inputs)
{
   int lowest = inputs[0];
   foreach(var input in inputs)
      if(input < lowest) lowest = input;
   return lowest;
}

Again, to make it foolproof you should check for an empty or null inputs array, because calling Lowest() will throw an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException.

share|improve this answer
    
And how can i solve the problem without using Linq? –  Tomten Dec 8 '10 at 18:14
    
@Tomten - You can just put the values into an array and use a quick sort ( look it up ) then assigned the variables accordingly. I feel strange about actually giving you the full answer. –  Ramhound Dec 8 '10 at 18:19
    
Again, the most easily read way to do it, it's a good simple and extendable solution, nice. –  Dave Dec 8 '10 at 18:19
    
@Ramhound; sorting the list is a bit excessive; you just have to scan the list for the lowest element. –  KeithS Dec 8 '10 at 18:21
    
He want another way to do it, didn't provide a reason, so I provided a method I knew he could use if this is indeed homework. –  Ramhound Dec 8 '10 at 18:24

This is one way to do it:

public int Highest
{
    get { return Math.Max(_score1, Math.Max(_score2, _score3)); }
}

public int Lowest
{
    get { return Math.Min(_score1, Math.Min(_score2, _score3)); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great, this works just fine. –  Tomten Dec 8 '10 at 18:19
int[] numbers = new[] { _score1, _score2, _score3 };
int min = numbers.Min();
int max = numbers.Max();
share|improve this answer
    
It appears Min and Max are not available in .NET Framework 2.0. In which version were these functions introduced? –  Nikola Malešević Dec 8 '10 at 18:37
    
They aren't available in any version; not as members of int[] anyhow. Min and Max are statics on the Math class. Since at least version 1.1 of the framework. –  ThatBlairGuy Dec 8 '10 at 18:57
    
Actually Min and Max are part of Linq introduced in 3.0. –  juharr Dec 9 '10 at 13:05
1  
Huh. Looks like I've learned my something new for the day. And it's not even noon yet. (Evidently the file where I tried that syntax didn't have a using for Linq.) –  ThatBlairGuy Dec 9 '10 at 16:38

Highest return (x > y) ? (x > z ? x : z) : (y > z ? y : z)

Lowest return (x < y) ? (x < z ? x : z) : (y < z ? y : z)

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1  
Eh, seems unnecessarily tricky and hard to fix errors. Hand-simulate this! –  Henry Jackson Dec 8 '10 at 18:16
3  
Preferably something that doesn't make our eyes bleed.. –  tpow Dec 8 '10 at 18:17

If you want to simply check which is the highest you can do this

private int _highest = _score1;  
if (_score2 > _highest)  
  _highest = _score2  
if (_score3 > _highest)  
  _highest = _score3

Similarly, you can find the lowest like so

private int _lowest = _score1;  
if (_score2 < _lowest)  
  _lowest = _score2  
if (_score3 < _lowest)  
  _lowest = _score3
share|improve this answer

Here's something you could do:

public class Numbers
{
    private int _number1;
    private int _number2;
    private int _number3;

    public readonly int Highest;
    public readonly int Lowest;

    public Numbers(int num1, int num2, int num3)
    {
        int high;
        int low;

        _number1 = num1;
        _number2 = num2;
        _number3 = num3;

        high = num1 > num2 ? num1 : num2;
        high = high > num3 ? high : num3;

        low = num1 < num2 ? num1 : num2;
        low = low < num3 ? low : num3;

        Highest = high;
        Lowest = low;
    }
}
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Using LINQ-to-Objects, you could do something like this.

var numbers = new [] {_score1, _score2, _score3};
numbers.Sort();
var lowest = numbers.First();
var highest = numbers.Last();
share|improve this answer
    
using Linq to Objects, you'd prefer Max() and Min() –  Jimmy Dec 8 '10 at 18:14
    
I like this, it's tried, tested and easily extended. Its also going to be the most straightforward to read and understand in my opinion. –  Dave Dec 8 '10 at 18:16
    
@Jimmy - I forgot about Min/Max. Yes, those would be better. –  James Kovacs Dec 8 '10 at 18:19

For a reference: in some cases you'll be having more than three variables (possibly not knowing how many). If they are stored in an array, here's the way to do it:

int Highest(int[] numbers)
{
    int highest = Int32.MinValue();

    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Length; i++)
    {
        if (numbers[i] > highest)
            highest = numbers[i];
    }

    return highest;
}

int Lowest(int[] numbers)
{
    int lowest = Int32.MaxValue();

    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Length; i++)
    {
        if (numbers[i] < lowest)
            lowest = numbers[i];
    }

    return lowest;
}

This will work for any length of int array.

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Find the Largest and smallest number

using System;

namespace LargeSmall;

{
    class Program
    {
        public static void Main()
        {

            float large, small;
            int[] a = new int[50];
            Console.WriteLine("Enter the size of Array");
            int max = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.WriteLine("Enter the array elements");
            for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
            {
                string s1 = Console.ReadLine();
                a[i] = Int32.Parse(s1);
            }
            Console.Write("");
            large = a[0];
            small = a[0];
            for (int i = 1; i < max; i++)
            {
                if (a[i] > large)
                    large = a[i];
                else if (a[i] < small)
                    small = a[i];
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Largest element in the array is {0}", large);
            Console.WriteLine("Smallest element in the array is {0}", small);
        }
    }
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