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Bumped into some code like this in our code base... which made me worried.

int foo(int a); // Forward declaration.

int baz() {
    int result = {
         int a = dosomestuff();
         foo(a);
    } ? 0 : -1;
    return result;
}
  1. Is the behavior of this code well-defined?
  2. Will it really work, that result variable gets loaded with 0 or -1 depending on the return value of foo(a)?

For interest: The code was not written like that originally - however, it is what I imagine this innocent-looking macro will roll out to...

int foo(int a); // Forward declaration.

#define BAR()  { int a = dosomestuff(); foo(a); }

int baz() {
    int result = BAR() ? 0 : -1;
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
Yow. What C compiler accepts that? gcc certainly doesn't. – aschepler Dec 8 '10 at 18:49
1  
@aschepler: ironically, it seems GCC is the only compiler that accepts it! See Michael Burr's answer. – André Caron Dec 8 '10 at 19:07
    
The compiler is VisualDSP++ by Analog Devices. I will probably ask support about this tomorrow. – Johan Kotlinski Dec 8 '10 at 20:49
up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is a GCC extension to C called 'statement expressions': http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Statement-Exprs.html

The key thing is that a statement expression returns the last thing it does as the value of the expression:

The last thing in the compound statement should be an expression followed by a semicolon; the value of this subexpression serves as the value of the entire construct.

In your example, that would be whatever foo(a) returns.

However the block must be enclosed in parens for GCC to accept the syntax.

int foo(); // Forward declaration.

int baz() {
    int result = ({
         int a = dosomestuff();
         foo(a);
    }) ? 0 : -1;
    return result;
}

I'm unaware of any other compiler that supports this.

share|improve this answer
    
You got there first. As an FYI here is the link to all GCC C extensions gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/C-Extensions.html#C-Extensions – Andrew White Dec 8 '10 at 18:58
4  
In this specific case, a more portable way to write it would probably be in order. Consider int result = foo(dosomestuff())? 0 : -1; – André Caron Dec 8 '10 at 19:06
1  
@André: definitely. The use-case for statement expressions seems to be to help create 'parameter-safe' macros or macros that iterate. I think there's very little reason to use them in normal functions. – Michael Burr Dec 8 '10 at 19:28
    
OK, thanks. The compiler I am using incidentally supports this aswell (just to be compatible with GCC). However, our code does not use the extra parentheses - so I assume this must be a bug in the compiler. – Johan Kotlinski Dec 8 '10 at 21:26
    
Indeed BAZ can be defined in standard C simply as #define BAZ() foo(dosomestuff()) – caf Dec 9 '10 at 0:13

You'd have to consult your compiler documentation. This construct is not allowed in standard C or standard C++.

It's trivial to clean this up however, e.g.

int baz()
{
    int result;
    {
         int a = dosomestuff();
         result = foo(a)? 0: -1;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I know the function can be made a lot shorter. I'm just giving an example of the minimal change necessary to make it standard-compliant. This conversion is purely mechanical, so it can be used on ANY code that uses this construct. – Ben Voigt Dec 9 '10 at 0:50

I do not know of a single compiler that will accept that. Additionally, you'd be better off doing this:

int foo();
int dosomestuff();

int baz()
{
   int result = foo(dosomestuff()) ? 0 : -1;
   return result;
}
share|improve this answer

It's not standard C++.

In standard C++, write

bool baz() { return !foo( dosomestuff() ); }

That's it.

share|improve this answer
    
That changes the behavior -- the original function returned 0 or -1, but bool is 0 and +1. – Ben Voigt Dec 9 '10 at 0:48
    
@Ben: yes, I know. ;-) – Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 9 '10 at 1:01

Because it's a non-pointer simple type, the exact value will be returned and so the return behavior is defined. That block is... really strange though, and I'm surprised there's a C compiler that won't choke on it out there.

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