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I have a question: How to draw a number from 0 to 4 in Java (android)? How to use the Random function?

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Please Pay Attantion - Calling each time the code:

Random r = new Random();

Will probably return you the same numbers (i guess few of you have noticed that phanamona).

I guess it connected somehow to the Java problem with random numbers: Java: Can (new Random()).nextInt(5) always return the same number? and: Java random always returns the same number when I set the seed?

Anyway my solution is to add a static variable to my class:

static Random sRandomGen = new Random();

and call the nextInt from the relevant method when i need the random number. Thatway i recieve an equal dividing between results.

int rnd = sRandomGen.nextInt(numofmatches - 1);

This solution works great for me.

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System.out.println(""+(int) (Math.random()*5.0));

If you only need to generate a single random number, I believe it's slightly cheaper to use the Math.random() than to make an object.

Note: to generate any random integer from 0 to n, (0 inclusive, n exclusive), just use:

(int) (Math.random()*n);

To generate any random integer from m to m+n, (m inclusive, m+n exclusive), just use:

m + (int) (Math.random()*n);
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Constructing an instance of Random is not necessary more expensive than your way – ognian Dec 8 '10 at 19:26
    
Ognian is correct, and to clarify, the first call to Math.random() actually creates a new java.util.Random object which will be used by all subsequent calls to Math.random(). – robert_x44 Dec 8 '10 at 20:02
    
good to know, thanks – nnythm Dec 8 '10 at 20:05

The follwing will do what you need.

Random r = new Random();
int randomInt = r.nextInt(5);

If you do this in a loop, make sure you initialize the Random outside of the loop.

Random r = new Random();
for(int i = 0;i < someThing; i++) {
    System.out.println(r.nextInt(5));
}

See the documentation for the Random class: http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Random.html

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One thing to be careful of is that you shouldn't create a new Random object every time you want a new number. This line should be executed once when the application starts:

Random r = new Random();

Then this should be called each time you want a new random number:

int x = r.nextInt(5);
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