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Using sed, I would like to extract STRING between the first occurrence of MATCH1 and the next occurrence of MATCH2.

echo "abcd MATCH1 STRING MATCH2 efgh MATCH1 ijk MATCH2 MATCH2 lmnop MATCH1" | sed...

I tried this in various ways, but given that MATCH1 and MATCH2 both may appear several times in a row, it has turned out difficult to extract STRING. Any idea how I can achieve this result?

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I updated my answer to include an optimized version of the single call to sed solution that only needs 3 replacements instead of 4 –  SiegeX Dec 9 '10 at 1:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

These only return the string between the matches and work even if MATCH1 == MATCH2.

echo ... | grep -Po '^.*?\K(?<=MATCH1).*?(?=MATCH2)'

Here's a sed solution:

echo ... | sed  's/MATCH1/&\n/;s/.*\n//;s/MATCH2/\n&/;s/\n.*//'

The advantage of these compared to some of the other solutions is that each one consists of only one call to a single utility.

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This doesn't return STRING but "abcd MATCH1 STRING MATCH2". –  lecodesportif Dec 8 '10 at 21:29
    
@lecodesportif: See my edited answer. The \K makes the .*? not be included in the output of the grep command. The sed version uses the "divide and conquer" technique in one call to sed. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 8 '10 at 21:38
    
This returns "MATCH1 STRING MATCH2", making it trivial to get STRING. But it doesn't work if MATCH1=MATCH2. The solution would need to cover this case, too. –  lecodesportif Dec 8 '10 at 21:45
    
@Dennis If I understand correctly (and maybe I don't), he wants to just match "STRING", rather than "MATCH1 STRING MATCH2". –  Brent Newey Dec 8 '10 at 21:45
    
@lecodesportif: See my edited answer. The commands now return only the string between the matchs (including the delimiting spaces - which could easily be excluded) and will work if MATCH1 == MATCH2. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 8 '10 at 21:58

You can do it with perl using non-greedy regex matches:

echo "abcd MATCH1 STRING MATCH2 efgh MATCH1 ijk MATCH2 MATCH2 lmnop MATCH1" | perl -pe 's|^.*?MATCH1(.*?)MATCH2.*$|\1|'

sed does not support these.

EDIT: Here is a solution that combines Dennis' solution with sed:

echo "abcd MATCH1 STRING MATCH2 efgh MATCH1 ijk MATCH2 MATCH2 lmnop MATCH1" | grep -Po '^.*?MATCH1.*?MATCH2' | sed 's/^.*MATCH1\(.*\)MATCH2$/\1/'
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I need to do it with sed or any shell builtin. How about using sed to delete everything until the first occurrence of MATCH1 and then deleting everything after the first occurrence of MATCH2? –  lecodesportif Dec 8 '10 at 21:23
    
@lecodesportif Does the grep/sed solution work? –  Brent Newey Dec 8 '10 at 21:33
    
See my edited answer. grep -P can do it using \K without needing sed. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 8 '10 at 21:40
    
+1 for alternative solution –  lecodesportif Dec 8 '10 at 21:57

You can do this with two calls to sed by first replacing the white spaces with new lines then piping that output to another instance of sed which deletes everything else.

sed 's/ /\n/g' | sed '1,/MATCH1/d;/MATCH2/,$d'


Edit

If the first line (after substitution) happens to be MATCH1, gnu sed can work around that by using 0,/MATCH1/ instead of 1,/MATCH1/ like so:

sed 's/ /\n/g' | sed '0,/MATCH1/d;/MATCH2/,$d'

Edit2

Optimized version of the single call to sed solution that only needs 3 replacements instead of 4

sed -r 's/MATCH1/&\n/;s/MATCH2/\n&/;s/^.*\n(.*)\n.*$/\1/'
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Better than anything I could come up with, but doesn't seem to work for strings starting with "MATCH1". –  Andrew Clark Dec 8 '10 at 21:21
    
good call, edited my post to address this possibility. –  SiegeX Dec 8 '10 at 21:37
    
+1, I gotta admit, I like this answer. –  Brent Newey Dec 8 '10 at 21:54
    
Unfortunately, the optimized version doesn't work if MATCH1 == MATCH2. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 9 '10 at 3:01
    
You are correct sir! Can't have your cake and eat it too. –  SiegeX Dec 9 '10 at 4:37

This might work for you:

echo "abcd MATCH1 STRING MATCH2 efgh MATCH1 ijk MATCH2 MATCH2 lmnop MATCH1" | 
sed 's/MATCH1/\n&/;s/[^\n]*\n//;s/\(MATCH2\).*/\1/'
MATCH1 STRING MATCH2
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