Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm keeping track of things in an array currently, but I don't need to know anything about them other than they're in the array. For example, I might have a forSale array, and I have all the itemIDs that are for sale in the array.

Works fine for now, but anyways, I've been doing some testing and it seems as if object.hasOwnProperty(x) blows array.indexOf(x) !== -1 out of the water (I know they're completely different but I don't know of any other way to test if an array has a value in it). This got me to thinking, why not just create something like

var saleObject = {
    "someId" : "",
    "someOtherId" : ""
};

I can then call saleObject.hasOwnProperty('someId') and know that that object is on sale. I can see no downsides to this, but that's why I'm here. Is there anything wrong in doing this?

share|improve this question
1  
Note that you can also use the in keyword if you know that you're working with a plain object: "someOtherId" in saleObject === true –  Sidnicious Dec 8 '10 at 21:29
    
Since you're just keeping track of a list of items, I think an array suits you much better. –  instantsetsuna Dec 9 '10 at 15:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No problem with it at all assuming you can modify the dependent code to accept the new structure. The difference in speed stems from the Object being able to do a Binary Search to determine whether it's got the key, whereas the indexOf has to check every value in the array.

share|improve this answer

No. It's a valid use of an object being that JavaScript objects are only enhanced associative arrays.

Also note that Array.indexOf is not a standard JavaScript method at this moment and you can't rely on it. It was introduced only in ECMA-262 edition 5.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.