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How would I be able to find if at least half of my objects in an array return true (on some function) using a divide and conquer algorithm? The objects have no enumerable value, thus object A is by no means greater than object B.

To clarify, comparing all objects to each other using that function. So funct(Obj a, Obj b) returns true or false based on some criteria. They can be clumped together, we just want to know whether at least half of the compared objects returned true.

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Are the ones that will return true for that function clumped together? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 8 '10 at 21:05
    
To clarify, comparing all objects to each other using that function. So funct(Obj a, Obj b) returns true or false based on some criteria. They can be clumped together, we just want to know whether at least half of the compared objects returned true. –  blahhhhhh Dec 8 '10 at 21:09
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Are you wanting to take all pairs of elements to be compared or is it that all the elements of the array are compared against a known value,e.g. if the array was of ints and you wanted to know if half were single digits? –  JB King Dec 8 '10 at 21:17
    
Compare all pairs of elements to be compared. Eg: a,b,c compares (a,b), (a,c), (b,c) but I need to know if at least half return true. These objects are not comparable and must be O(nlogn) –  blahhhhhh Dec 8 '10 at 21:20

2 Answers 2

Why would you want to use divide and conquer ? Answering your question looks to be O(n) when using trivial algorithm 'iterate and count'... and you can't possibly know half of the objects will return true using any algorithm checking less than O(n/2) objects, which is the same as O(n).

EDIT: OK, the edit shows it's not a predicate you're applying. So my answer does not apply. I still does not understand how you really define 'half the object return true'. They return true compared to what ? What we have is n**2 pairs (maybe less, it is unclear if an object can be compared to itself). Do you mean half the n**2 pairs return true when comparison function is applied ?

If so a reasoning very similar to the previous one will conclude you are doomed and can't do better than O(n**2)

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Example: given (a, b, c, d) if some function FUNCTION(a, b) = true. Then at least half of the objects returned true. –  blahhhhhh Dec 8 '10 at 21:27
    
The objects returned being all the possible pairs ? –  kriss Dec 8 '10 at 21:32
    
If so, again you are doomed, no divide and conquer here. But there may be some possible paralelisation as suggested another poster. –  kriss Dec 8 '10 at 21:35

Depends on a lot of things:

How many objects are there? Are they ordered? What language are you using? What machine is this running on?

I'd say that if you have a lot of items, randomly ordered, on a machine who's processes would benefit from threading, create a few threads and assign each one a chunk of data to work with. Once you get the number of passes or fails greater than half the number of objects, you have your answer.

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There are n number of objects. Always different size. They are not ordered, and therefore have no ordering value. Does not matter the language or machine. –  blahhhhhh Dec 8 '10 at 21:12

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