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Is there a way in Java to get a method to lock (mutex) the object which it is in?

I know this sounds confusing but basically I wan't an equivelent to this snippet of C# but in Java.

lock(this)
{
    // Some code here...
}

I've been tasked with reimplementing an API written in .Net into Java, and I've been asked to keep the Java version as similar to the .Net version as humanly possible. This isn't helped by the fact that the .Net version looked like it was transcribed from a C++ version which I don't have access to.

Anyway the above line appears in the C# version and I need something that does the same in Java.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The equivalent of that is:

synchronized (this)
{
}

(And no, you shouldn't generally do it in either C# or Java. Prefer locking on private references which nothing else has access to. You may be aware of that already, of course - but I didn't want to leave an answer without the warning :)

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Thanks Jon, I was convinced I'd tried that and Eclipse was moaning about it. Maybe I'd mis-spelt synchronised and hadn't noticed. –  Omar Kooheji Jan 13 '09 at 15:28
    
Why should you prefer to lock private references? See also stackoverflow.com/questions/416183/… –  eljenso Jan 13 '09 at 15:32
1  
Because then other code can't expectedly lock on you. It's like exposing more methods than you have to - but harder to debug, because threading is fundamentally hard. –  Jon Skeet Jan 13 '09 at 15:41
1  
If you want to expose the lock, then that's one thing - but otherwise, what benefit is there in locking on something which others might lock on? There's the tiny, tiny benefit of not having to create a new object - but that's basically it. See also P636-639 of Jeff Richter's CLR via C#. –  Jon Skeet Jan 13 '09 at 16:05
1  
Great answer, but I do think that "threading is fundamentally hard" is unhelpful (although perhaps true). It too easily becomes an excuse for programmers not to learn threading properly. –  Draemon Jan 14 '09 at 2:54

Assuming that the C++ code is a simple mutex, replace "lock" with "synchronized"

synchronized (this)
{
// ...
}

Here's the Java Concurrency tutorial for more info

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I'd recommend Brian Goetz's "Java Concurrency In Practice." It's an excellent book.

It can be a good thing to keep the synchronized block as small as possible. Using the synchronized modifier on the method is coarse-grained and sometimes necessary, but otherwise you can use another object to do it that keeps the block smaller.

Like this:

public class PrivateLock {
    private final Object myLock = new Object();
    @GuardedBy("myLock") Widget widget;

    void someMethod() {
        synchronized (myLock) {
            // Access or modify the state of widget
        }
    }
}
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You should also look into the java.util.concurrent package of the API (JDK 5.0+) for additional concurrency management objects such as semaphore, exchanger, etc

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/package-summary.html

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