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When reading others code I have seen functions written both ending with a semi-colon and not ending with a semi-colon.

with:

var testFunction = function() {
  // magic happens here
};

without:

var testFunction = function() {
  // magic happens here
}
  • ?: Is one more "technically" correct than the other?
  • ?: Is there a speed advantage to one?
  • ?: Do browsers not care and so it's just a style bleeding over from another language or an old format that used to be required for JavaScript functions?
  • ?: #{question I hadn't considered to ask here but you think I should have}

Update: I also found this very useful => https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Functions_and_function_scope

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3  
I just tested this, and it appeared that in my favorite browser the version without a semicolon was remarkably faster! –  Marcel Korpel Dec 8 '10 at 23:10
    
@Marcel, Interesting! What code did you use to test and what were the results? –  Mike Grace Dec 8 '10 at 23:11
5  
you may find the following on semi-colon insertion interesting - inimino.org/~inimino/blog/javascript_semicolons –  Russ Cam Dec 8 '10 at 23:18
    
+1, what a great question! –  Alex Dec 8 '10 at 23:21
    
Add to the test on your machine/browser... jsperf.com/function-assignment-semicolon It's been about the same for me on Chrome 8 –  Box9 Dec 8 '10 at 23:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

At it's root, what you have there is an assignment statement, and according to the Google Javascript Style Guide, all statements should end in a ;. Especially assignment statements. JSLint requires ; or else it won't pass.

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1  
+1 for the awesome link to the Google JavaScript style guide. –  Mike Grace Dec 8 '10 at 23:21

There are two ways to define functions:

var testFunction = function() {
  // magic happens here
};

and

function testFunction(){
  // magic happens here
}

I believe it's better to end with a ; when you define it using a statement (first option), but not as a function definition (second option).

JS Parsers are pretty flexible, so YMMV.

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YMMV == Your Mileage May Vary –  TelegramSam Dec 8 '10 at 23:15
1  
The first example is a function declaration, not a function statement, which is a proprietary thing of Mozilla. –  Marcel Korpel Dec 8 '10 at 23:17
1  
The first example is used to define in closures, and works in all A grade browsers... –  TelegramSam Dec 8 '10 at 23:20
    
+1 for a great, concise, to-the-point answer. –  Alex Dec 8 '10 at 23:28

I would consider it technically correct to have the ; semicolon terminate the function because you are executing a declarative statement. Though not required by the grammar, it is generally accepted that variable declarations be terminated with a ; semicolon. In this case, the "variable" just happens to be a function.

// As you do this
var i = 0;

// Also do this
var obj = function() {
  // aforementioned magic
};

It may also be worthy to note that, when declaring objects, each field is separated with a comma ,.

var obj = function() {
  magic1 : function() {},
  magic2 : function() {}, // <-- Similarly, comma is optional here...sorta
                          //     See Marcel's comment below.
};

Of course, for simple functions declarations, it could be considered "more technically correct" to not have it since it is not a linearly executed statement. (See excellent counterpoint in Google style guide, etc) In this case, the semicolon ; gets interpreted as an "empty" line of code, not an expression termination token.

With simple function declarations, leave it off:

function doMagic() {
  // aforementioned magic
}
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You probably mean function declarations instead of "global functions" and the second one is just a function expression; you don't define a closure there (i.e., not closure in strict sense). –  Marcel Korpel Dec 8 '10 at 23:22
    
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Not the trailing comma, not again, IE will create an empty element with horrible results. –  Marcel Korpel Dec 8 '10 at 23:32
1  
Uhm, I might have been a bit to fast, as this generally applies to arrays, but a quick search revealed that it also applies to objects (and replace "array" with "object", there). Also see this NetBeans bug. –  Marcel Korpel Dec 8 '10 at 23:41
1  
That's disgusting! I picked up the "trailing comma" habit when I first learned Python. Thanks for teaching me something today, even if it was just another example IE ridiculousness! –  zourtney Dec 8 '10 at 23:50
1  
Only Jon Skeet has the power to overcome trailing commas in IE. –  Alex Dec 9 '10 at 5:47

Is one more "technically" correct than the other?

No. Technically you're assigning a value to a variable that happens to be a function, just the same as var x = 10. You can declare this with or without the ; and it's equally correct either way.

Is there a speed advantage to one?

I would be immensely surprised if there was a noticeable difference.

Do browsers not care and so it's just a style bleeding over from another language or an old format that used to be required for JavaScript functions?

Browsers don't care, it's just a quirk of the language.

question I hadn't considered to ask here but you think I should have

Which one is more readable, you say? I personally prefer to end statements with a ; because it feels right and is more clear about what you're doing. I come from Java-land, where this is required, but even when it isn't I think it's clearer to explicitly end the statement with a ;, so I include it.

But, as with any code style argument, it quickly becomes a matter of personal choice, and there be flamewars. Proceed with caution.

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3  
It's not only clearer to use a semicolon to end a function expression, it's also obligatory to JSLint and, what's more important, when you're minifying your code. –  Marcel Korpel Dec 8 '10 at 23:16
    
@Marcel, good point on JSLint. I "grew up" on C++ where the only times a semicolon legitimately followed a closing } where 1) end of class definitions and 2) end of do...while(); statements. From that background, terminating a function with a semicolon seems superfluous, though not necessarily "wrong". –  zourtney Dec 8 '10 at 23:33

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