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I'm just learning about how to best organize my javascript code, and I had a question regarding this small piece of code I wrote:

var reportsControllerIndex = {
    plotMapPoints: function(data) {
        //plots points
    },

    drawMap: function() {
        $.getJSON('/reports.json', function(data) {
            reportsControllerIndex.plotMapPoints(data);         
        });
    },

    run: function() {
        reportsControllerIndex.drawMap();
    }
};

The question is regarding calling another function of reportsControllerIndex from within the reportsControllerIndex object. I had first tried the following piece of code for the run function:

run: function() {
    this.drawMap();
}

which worked perfectly. However, I then quickly found doing this for the drawMap function:

drawMap: function() {
    $.getJSON('/reports.json', function(data) {
        this.plotMapPoints(data);         
    });
}

does not work, since "this" would now refer to the callback function of the getJSON call.

My solution was to just place reportsControllerIndex in front of all of the methods I want to call, but I was curious: is there a more relative way for calling functions within an overall object like this (much like you'd do with a class in a standard OO language)? Or am I forced to do it as I am currently, just calling the methods through the name of the object?

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up vote 12 down vote accepted

You want to store the this binding in a variable.

drawMap: function() {
    var _this = this;
    $.getJSON('/reports.json', function(data) {
        _this.plotMapPoints(data);         
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, that makes a lot of sense, thanks! Would you say that overall this practice is used in more javascript code than Josiah's suggestion below? I like the idea of using "self" better just for my own OO mindset, but I'd rather follow standard practices in the JS world where I can. – joeellis Dec 8 '10 at 23:37
    
@japancheese - I don't believe there is a convention so you should use what you like. Just remember to keep the name reasonable. – ChaosPandion Dec 8 '10 at 23:49

Late answer, but jQuery has a method called jQuery.proxy() that is made for this purpose. You pass it the function along with the value of this you want to retain, and it will return a function that ensures this is correct.

This way you don't need to define a variable.

drawMap: function() {
    $.getJSON('/reports.json', $.proxy(function(data) {
        this.plotMapPoints(data);         
    }, this));
}
share|improve this answer

You need to use a variable reference to this outside the getJSON function. getJSON sets the context of the callback within jquery.

Like this:

var self = this;
$.getJSON('/reports.json', function(data) {
    self.plotMapPoints(data);         
});
share|improve this answer
plotMapPoints: function(data) {
    //plots points
}.bind(this)

when defining your function you can just add .bind(this) to set the correct context for that function.

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