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I have a class that gets two properties injected into it:

private CustomRatesService customRatesService;
private TokenAuthenticator tokenAuthenticator;

public void setCustomRatesService(CustomRatesService customRatesService) {
    this.customRatesService = customRatesService;
}

public void setTokenAuthenticator(TokenAuthenticator tokenAuthenticator) {
    this.tokenAuthenticator = tokenAuthenticator;
}

Here's the applicationContext.xml:

<bean id="customRatesServiceBean" class="com.ms.rate.service.SetCustomRatesResourceImpl">
<property name="tokenAuthenticator" ref="tokenAuthenticator"/>    
  <property name="customRatesService" ref="customRatesService"/>
</bean>

And a services.xml file containing the beans

<bean id="customRatesService" class="com.ms.rate.service.CustomRatesServiceImpl">
  <property name="customRateDao" ref="customRateDao" />
</bean>

<bean id="tokenAuthenticator" class="com.ms.rate.service.TokenAuthenticatorImpl">
  <property name="authenticationUrl" value="${AUTHENTICATION_URL}"/>
</bean>

Yet if I put a breakpoint in a method, I can see that the tokenAuthenticator is always null, though the other property has a value

Could it be because the class has a WebService annotation? I'm completely baffled.

I've put debug all over the place and I can see:

The tokenAuthenticator bean is definitely getting created. Plus, it is definitely getting injected! I can see a valid reference if I print out the reference from the injecting method in the class. It's just null when I go to use it..

Very grateful for any thoughts!!

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

Ok it turned out to be an idiotic mistake on my part.

For some reason I had used that class as the implementation for two beans. The debugger was showing me the injector getting called, but on the creation of the bean I wasn't using. On the bean I was using, I hadn't added the second property. Gah...

Just leaving this up here in case anyone else does something so foolish, and if nothing else then as a little self-humiliation to discourage me from doing this again.

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