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I am using Fluent NHibernate and NHibernate.Core 3 beta 1. I have two classes:

public class Promotion
{
    public Promotion()
    {
        PromotionEntrants = new List<PromotionEntrant>();
    }

    public virtual int Id { get; set; }        
    [Required]
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    ...
    public virtual IList<PromotionEntrant> PromotionEntrants { get; set; }
}

public class PromotionEntrant
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    ...
    public virtual Promotion Promotion { get; set; }
}

I am using auto mapping, which generates the schema I expect and things seem to be working as expected for the most part.

I have the following action (ASP.NET MVC 3 RC) for saving/creating Promotions:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SavePromo(Promotion promo)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // .SaveOrUpdateCopy(promo) results in the same SQL
        NhSession.SaveOrUpdate(promo);
        NhSession.Flush();
    }

    ...
}

This executes the expected "update Promotion ..." query, however it also executes the following:

UPDATE [PromotionEntrant] SET PromotionId = null WHERE PromotionId = @p0;@p0 = 1 [Type: Int32 (0)]

How do I prevent this from happening?

My only guess is that it is seeing the empty List on the Promotion object (constructed by ASP.NET MVC thus not attached to the NH Session), taking that to mean there should be no child PromotionEntrants. To try and prevent that, I created the following auto-mapping override, but it does not make a difference.

public class PromotionMappingOverride : IAutoMappingOverride<Promotion>
{
    public void Override(AutoMapping<Promotion> mapping)
    {
        mapping.HasMany(p => p.PromotionEntrants)
            .Cascade.None();
    }
}

Any help would be much appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Verify that PromotionEntrant.Promotion actually points back to the promotion. Given that this is a bidirectional relationship, the relationship is managed from the child side of the relationship. From the parent side, you'll have an inverse=true collection.

BTW - You really should be running your code in a transaction. If you are already, the NhSession.Flush() is superfluous.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems that setting the parent's side of the relationship to Inverse was the key. I removed Cascade.None() and added .Inverse() to the PromotionMappingOverride and now that action only updates the Promotion as expected. I guess auto mapping does not set the parent side as Inverse by default? Thanks for the transaction tip. I was thinking the transaction was unnecessary since it should only result in one update, but I can see where that would be assuming too much about the mapping in some cases. –  Andy Morris Dec 9 '10 at 15:17
    
I haven't looked to see if FNH sets bidirectional relationships with inverse=true. If it doesn't, there is an extra update to the FK as both parent and child sides think they're managing the relationship. IMHO automapping is fantastic for getting started and iterating quickly, but I usually switch to ClassMap<T> and conventions once the model has settled down. Glad I could help and set you on the right path to a solution. –  James Kovacs Dec 9 '10 at 17:21

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