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When using prepared statements in PDO should I "build" a prepared statement for every db call or can I use one statement for all calls? example:

 class DB{
    ...
    function query($sqlStatementString,$data){
        $this->sth->prepare($sqlStatementString);
        $this->sth->execute($data);
    }
    ...
}

OR

class User{
    ...
    function doSomething(){
        $sthForDoSomething->prepare(...);
        $sthForDoSomething->execute(...);
    }
    ...
    function jump(){
        $sthForJump->prepare(...);
        $sthForJump->execute(...);
    }
}

Are there memory/speed implications of using one method over the other? thanks!

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To display your code as code blocks, you need to indent them by four spaces (highlight them and press Ctrl+K). –  BoltClock Dec 9 '10 at 0:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are ever going to issue the same query more than once, with only different parameters bound to the placeholders, you should try to structure your code in such a way that you can reuse the statement. Calling prepare causes the database to create and cache an execution plan for the query which you will reuse in future calls to execute, making those queries faster.

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So I guess making the call from a generic query method in a DB class is out of the question. I should define each prepared statement in every model. Now a second question arises: defining these on the model would redeclare them with every instance of that model? if so, it would be better to build an intermediate layer between the db and the model to define these statements only 1 time each? Thanks Dan! –  Juank Dec 9 '10 at 0:44
1  
You're probably going overboard there, when you should be spending that time on your app instead of building another layer of DB abstraction. The benefits of reusing execution plans are usually pretty minor -- do it when you know it counts, or when it's easy. Letting your model methods reuse statements is easy; if a method is going to loop through a bunch of things and execute the same query on each one with different data, that's a good reuse of the prepared statement. Having many instances of a model class reuse a prepared statement is hard, and probably not worth the time. –  Dan Grossman Dec 9 '10 at 0:59
    
Wise suggestion, thanks Dan! –  Juank Dec 9 '10 at 1:06

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