Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It's usually fairly widely agreed that usability of switch control blocks is horrible since the programmer has to 'remember' to insert a break statement at the end of each block. Some languages have tackled this with implicit break statements, while others have disallowed fallthrough altogether.

I treat my case and break statements a little differently from convention and I'm wondering if I'm the only one. The below is javascript, but it could be any language with C-style switch blocks.

switch (LETTER) {

    case "A":
        DoSomethingA();
    break;

    case "B":
        DoSomethingB();
    break;

    case "C":
        DoSomethingC();
    break;

    default:
      throw "Error";
}

Having the break indented at the same level as the case label instantly improves readability to me. Does any one else do this? Why doesn't everybody do this?

** I'd normally have marked this community wiki - feel free to do so if required.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by dtb, Richard Hein, EboMike, Randy Levy, Jim Lewis Dec 9 '10 at 2:19

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I used to do this, but quickly got sick of not being able to tell some of my IDEs doing it the other way to stop. –  BoltClock Dec 9 '10 at 1:59
    
In JS, you can make an object of function references: { A: DoSomethingA, B: DoSomethingB, C: DoSomethingC }[LETTER](); (Of course, make it less ugly; just small example.) –  strager Dec 9 '10 at 2:04
4  
I think discussing indentation/bracket styles is like discussing politics and religion and ends up in a shouting match :) –  EboMike Dec 9 '10 at 2:05
    
I believe JSLint catches missing breaks. I could be wrong, but I don't think it'd be hard to add it to JSLint, either. –  strager Dec 9 '10 at 2:13
    
@ebo +1 but I really was curious if this is considered bad form or not. –  Josh Smeaton Dec 9 '10 at 2:17

3 Answers 3

That's easy to read when it's very small like that. But what if a case gets very large? Someone coming to maintain your code, such as myself, would see the break and, at first, assume it's in a parent code block.

Here are some agreed upon indentation styles

I try my best to use 1TBS Style where ever I can, switches included.

share|improve this answer
    
I would argue that very long case blocks are inherently evil, but I do see your point. –  Josh Smeaton Dec 9 '10 at 2:14
    
Yes, long case blocks are bad too, but this would add to the bad unnecessarily. Even if they are short case statements, my first reaction would be "What's going on with these... oh I see." And then immediately change them. –  MYou Dec 9 '10 at 2:18
    
And that is why I asked the question. To identify if I should stop it now, or try to change the world =) –  Josh Smeaton Dec 9 '10 at 2:19
    
As long as your code compiles, it's right on a technical level and you can leave it anyway you want. But the reason we follow convention is for maintainability; down the line, anyone can instantly see what's going on. So my suggestion is to always try to follow some form of convention, if there is one for what you're doing. Especially if there is a prevalent one at the place you're writing the code in the first place such as work or school. Even if you think your way is slightly better. –  MYou Dec 9 '10 at 2:25
    
I do try to follow convention in any code base I touch - the only time I will deviate is by cleaning up existing code to match a standard convention (like .NET or Python). I'm suggesting that the convention for switch blocks is wrong, and I feel I can make that statement in this specific case because there are many writings on the pitfalls of switch block syntax and rules. Anyway, this was closed for being subjective and that's exactly what this is, so I won't argue it further. Thanks for the discussion. –  Josh Smeaton Dec 9 '10 at 3:17
switch (LETTER) 
{ 
    case "A":
    {
        DoSomethingA();
        break;
    }
    case "B":
    {
        DoSomethingB();
        break;
    }
    case "C":
    {
        DoSomethingC();
        break;
    }
    default:
    {
        throw "Error";
    }
}

I format mine like this

share|improve this answer
1  
But you can still forget the break; easily, which is the point of asking the question. –  strager Dec 9 '10 at 2:06
    
No because the first thing I do is format the switch statement with the break and nothing else before I populate it. Have never forgot to add break in like 6 years i've been writing switch cases like that. –  Phill Dec 9 '10 at 2:09

I suppose it does make any "break"less code stand out. In fact I may use this myself next time I code up a switch.

I personally like the fall through! Although it can be a source of hard to track bugs its invaluable when coding up state machine type parsers. In particuler there are situations where a "clause" can be ended by a selection of keywords, so you want to process the current clause and pop out of that state, but, you still need to process the keyword to establish the new state. You just cannot do this with a switch statement that disallows fall through.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree fall throughs are convenient. But it has been abused so much for so long. –  code4life Dec 9 '10 at 2:14
    
Fall throughs are fantastic, I use them where required. But I feel this layout makes fall through stand out and explicit rather than hiding amongst the 'normal' case. –  Josh Smeaton Dec 9 '10 at 2:16
1  
Agreed. I like the layout. When I am being good I put a shouted /*FALLS THROUGH*/ comment where the break should go. –  James Anderson Dec 9 '10 at 2:25

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.