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First of all I have to admit that my programming skills are pretty limited and I took over a (really small) existing C++ OOP project where I try to push my own stuff in. Unfortunately I'm experiencing a problem which goes beyond my knowledge and I hope to find some help here. I'm working with a third party library (which cannot be changed) for grabbing images from a camera and will use some placeholder names here.

The third party library has a function "ThirdPartyGrab" to start a continuous live grab and takes a pointer to a function which will be called every time a new frame arrives. So in a normal C application it goes like this:

ThirdPartyGrab (HookFunction);

"HookFunction" needs to be declared as:

long _stdcall HookFunction (long, long, void*);

or "BUF_HOOK_FUNCTION_PTR" which is declared as

typedef long (_stdcall *HOOK_FUNCTION_PTR) (long, long, void*);

Now I have a C++ application and a class "MyFrameGrabber" which should encapsulate everything I do. So I put in the hook function as a private member like this:

long _stdcall HookFunction (long, long, void*);

Also there is a public void function "StartGrab" in my class which should start the Grab. Inside I try to call:

ThirdPartyGrab (..., HookFunction, ...);

which (not surprisingly) fails. It says that the function call to MyFrameGrabber::HookFunction misses the argument list and I should try to use &MyFrameGrabber::HookFunction to create a pointer instead. However passing "&MyFrameGrabber::HookFunction" instead results in another error that this cannot be converted to BUF_HOOK_FUNCTION_PTR.

After reading through the C++ FAQ function pointers I think I understand the problem but can't make up a solution. I tried to make the hook function static but this also results in a conversion error. I also thought of putting the hook function outside of the class but I need to use class functions inside the hook function. Is there another way or do I need to change my whole concept?

EDIT 14.01.08: I tested the singleton workaround since I cannot change the third party library and the void pointer is only for data that is used inside the hook function. Unfortunately it didn't worked out of the box like I hoped.... I don't know if the static function needs to be in a separate class so I put it in my "MyFrameGrabber" class:

static MyFrameGrabber& instance()
{
    	static MyFrameGrabber _instance;
    	return _instance;
}
long Hook(long, long, void*); // Implementation is in a separate cpp file

In my cpp file I have the call_hook function:

long MFTYPE call_hook(long x, MIL_ID y, void MPTYPE *z)
{
    return MyFrameGrabber::instance().Hook(x,y,z);
}
void
MyFrameGrabber::grab ()
{
    ThirdPartyGrab(..., call_hook, ...);
}

But this gives me an error in static MatroxFrameGrabber _instance; that no matching standard constructor is found. That's correct because my MyFrameGrabber constructor looks like this:

MyFrameGrabber (void* x,
                const std::string &y, int z,
                std::string &zz);

I tried to put in an empty constructor MyFrameGrabber(); but this results in a linker error. Should I pass empty parameters to the MyFrameGrabber constructor in the singleton? Or do I need to have a separate Hook Class and if yes how could I access MyFrameGrabber functions? Thanks in advance.

SECOND EDIT 15.01.08: I applied the changes and it compiles and links now. Unfortunately I cannot test this at runtime yet because it's a DLL and I have no Debug Caller Exe yet and there are other problems during initialization etc. I will mark the post as answer because I'm sure this is the right way to do this.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason "&MyFrameGrabber::HookFunction" cannot be converted to a BUF_HOOK_FUNCTION_PTR is that, being a member of the class, it has implicitly as first parameter the "this" pointer, thus you cannot convert a member function to a non-member function: the two signatures look the same but are actually different.

I would declare an interface, defining the function to call, have your class implement it and pass the object itself instead of the callback (you can think of an interface as the object-oriented replacement of a function pointer):

class IHookInterface{
public:
    virtual long HookFunction(long, long, void*) = 0;
};
 class HookClass : public IHookInterface{
public:
    virtual long Hook(long, long, void*) {
        // your code here... 
    }
};

// new definition: ThirdPartyGrab (..., IHookInterface, ...);

EDIT - other possible solution in case you cannot modify the library: use a singleton rather than a static function.

class HookClass{
public:
    static HookClass& instance(){
        static HookClass _instance;
        return _instance;
    }
    long Hook(long, long, void*) {
        // your code here... 
    }
};

long call_hook(long x,long y,void * z){
    return HookClass::instance().Hook(x,y,z);
}

SECOND EDIT: you might slightly modify the singleton class with an initialization method to call the constructor with the proper parameters, but maybe it is not more elegant than the following solution, which is simpler:

class HookClass{
public:

    HookClass(string x,string y...){
    }

    long Hook(long, long, void*) {
        // your code here... 
    }
};

static HookClass * hook_instance = 0;

long call_hook(long x,long y,void * z){
    if (0 != hook_instance){
        return hook_instance->Hook(x,y,z);
    }
}

int main(){
    hook_instance = new HookClass("x","y");
    ThirdPartyGrab(..., call_hook, ...);
}
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I think with "third-party library" the OP meant that he cannot change the library. My assumption may well be wrong, though. –  gimpf Jan 13 '09 at 16:13
    
@gimpf - thanks, you are probably right... –  Paolo Tedesco Jan 13 '09 at 16:15
    
A common use of the void* parameter in C callbacks is as the this-> pointer for C++. That means you'd write long (Hook, Hook) and skip the static hook_instance –  MSalters Jan 15 '09 at 8:57

Your private member method has an implicit this pointer as first argument. If you write that out, it's obvious that the function signatures do not match.

You need to write a static member function, which can be passed as the callback-function to the library. The last argument to the HookFunction, a void*, looks to me very much like a cookie, where one can pass ones own pointer in.

So, all in all, it should be something like this:

class MyClass {
  long MyCallback(long, long) {
    // implement your callback code here
  }

  static long __stdcall ThirdPartyGrabCallback(long a, long b, void* self) {
    return reinterpret_cast<MyClass*>(self)->MyCallback(a, b);
  }
public:
  void StartGrab() {
    ThirdPartyGrab(..., &MyClass::ThirdPartyGrabCallback, ..., this, ...);
  }
};

This of course only works if the void* argument is doing what I said. The position of the this in the ThirdPartyGrab() call should be easy to find when having the complete function signature including the parameter names available.

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