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This question was asked in the written round of a job interview:

 #include<alloc.h>
 #define MAXROW 3
 #define MAXCOL 4

 main()
  {
    int (*p)[MAXCOL];
     p = (int (*)[MAXCOL]) malloc(MAXROW*(sizeof(*p)));
  }

How many bytes are allocated in the process?

To be honest, I did not answer the question. I did not understand the assignment to p.

Can anybody explain me what would be the answer and how it can be deduced?

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1  
Whoever asked this interview question obviously never tried to actually compile this code. –  Charles Salvia Dec 9 '10 at 6:18
    
Are you sure? It looks like it might compile on some junk systems... –  R.. Dec 9 '10 at 6:20
    
Not without an extra ) –  Charles Salvia Dec 9 '10 at 6:31
    
@Charles : Corrected that –  Flash Dec 9 '10 at 6:33
    
The 144 bytes was not due to an allocation round up, but do to my mis-entering the program with an extra multiplication by MAXROW when attempting to test it. With this corrected, the experimental answer on a system with 4-byte ints is 48 bytes, matching the theoretical answers given. Sorry for the confusion. –  Chris Stratton Dec 9 '10 at 7:51

10 Answers 10

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's platform dependent.

int (*p)[MAXCOL]; declares an pointer to an array of integers MAXCOL elements wide (MAXCOL of course is 4 in this case). One element of this pointer is therefore 4*sizeof(int) on the target platform.

The malloc statement allocates a memory buffer MAXROW times the size of the type contained in P. Therefore, in total, MAXROW*MAXCOL integers are allocated. The actual number of bytes will depend on the target platform.

Also, there's probably additional memory used by the C runtime (as internal bookeeping in malloc, as well as the various process initialization bits which happen before main is called), which is also completely platform dependant.

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p is a pointer to an array of MAXCOL elements of type int, so sizeof *p (parentheses were redundant) is the size of such an array, i.e. MAXCOL*sizeof(int).

The cast on the return value of malloc is unnecessary, ugly, and considered harmful. In this case it hides a serious bug: due to missing prototype, malloc is assumed implicitly to return int, which is incompatible with its correct return type (void *), thus resulting in undefined behavior.

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if you add to your answer the actual bytes allocated this will be the best answer yet –  SiegeX Dec 9 '10 at 6:25
    
The argument sounds good, but turns out not to be what happens. I instrumented the code and found 144 bytes allocated. –  Chris Stratton Dec 9 '10 at 6:32
2  
@Chris: the implementation using more than expected doesn't invalidate R's calculation. You can only calculate how much the program asks malloc to allocate - a lower bound - malloc is perfectly free to round that up any way it wants, based on any fixed-size buckets or page sizes it uses internally to speed its algorithms. Further, the program may allocate heap from other initialisation code - be careful not to include that when comparing expectations re p and the malloc explicitly requested. –  Tony D Dec 9 '10 at 6:37
    
I instrument the value passed to malloc, which was a request for 144 bytes, on a sytem where ints and pointers are both 32 bits. We can argue about why that is the answer, but experiment shows it to be the case. –  Chris Stratton Dec 9 '10 at 6:40
1  
@Chris - R. said that MAXCOL*sizeof(int) is the sizeof *p, not that it's the amount malloc'd –  David Gelhar Dec 9 '10 at 6:55

sizeof(*p) will be MAXCOL*sizeof(int). So totally MAXROW*MAXCOL*sizeof(int) number of bytes are alloctaed.

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You might want to check out cdecl for help translating C declarations into English. In this instance, int (*p)[4]; becomes declare p as pointer to array 4 of int.

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1  
+1 for cdecl... –  Noufal Ibrahim Dec 9 '10 at 6:25
    
+1 because I used cdecl while composing my answer. (I initially thought the declaration was an array of function pointers rather than raw integers) –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '10 at 6:38
#include<alloc.h>
#define MAXROW 3 
#define MAXCOL 4
main()   {
    int (*p)[MAXCOL];
    p = (int (*)[MAXCOL]) malloc(MAXROW*(sizeof(*p));
}

How many bytes are allocated in the process ?

p is a pointer, so will occupy sizeof(int(*)[MAXCOL]) on the stack, which might look daunting but it's almost always the same as sizeof(void*), sizeof(int*) or any other pointer. Obviously pointer sizes are what give applications their classification as 16-, 32-, 64-etc. bits, and this pointer will be correspondingly sized.

Then p is pointed at some memory obtained from malloc...

malloc( MAXROW * sizeof(*p) )

sizeof(*p) is the size of the int array that p points to, namely sizeof(int) * MAXCOL, so we get

malloc( MAXROW * (sizeof(int) * MAXCOL) )

requested from the heap. For illustrative purposes, if we assume the common 32-bit int size, we're looking at 48 bytes. The actual usage may be rounded up to whatever the heap routines feel like (heap routines often used fixed-sized "buckets" to speed their operations).

To confirm this expectation, simply substitute a logging function for malloc():

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXROW 3
#define MAXCOL 4

void* our_malloc(size_t n)
{
    printf("malloc(%ld)\n", n);
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    int (*p)[MAXCOL];
    p = (int (*)[MAXCOL]) our_malloc(MAXROW*(sizeof(*p)));
}

Output on my Linux box:

malloc(48)

The fact that malloc's returned pointer is cast to p's type doesn't affect the amount of memory allocation done.

As R sharply observes, lack of a malloc prototype would cause the compiler to expect malloc to return int rather than the actually-returned void*. In practice, it's probable that the lowest sizeof(int) bytes from the pointer would survive the conversion, and if sizeof(void*) happened to be equal to sizeof(int), or - more tenuous yet - the heap memory happens to start at an address representable in an int despite the size of pointers being larger (i.e. all the truncated bits were 0s anyway), then later dereferencing of the pointer just might work. Cheap plug: C++ won't compile unless it's seen the prototype.

That said, perhaps your alloc.h contains a malloc prototype... I don't have an alloc.h so I guess it's non-Standard.

Any program will also allocate memory for many other things, such as a stack frame providing some context within which main() may be called. The amount of memory for that varies with the compiler, version, compiler flags, operating system etc..

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int (*p)[MAXCOL] == int (*p)[4] == "pointer to array 4 of int" (see Note below)

sizeof(*p) would then be what p points to, i.e. 4 * sizeof(int). Multiply that by MAXROW and your final answer is:

12 * sizeof(int)

Note: This is in contrast to:

int *p[MAXCOL] == int *p[4] == "array 4 of pointer to int"
The parentheses make quite a bit of difference!

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It should be MAXROW*MAXCOL*sizeof(int) number of bytes

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I really dislike questions like this, because I think it's far better as a working engineer to run the experiment than to assume that you know what you are doing - especially if there's reason for suspicion such as a program not working as expected or someone crafting trick questions.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define MAXROW 3
#define MAXCOL 4

main()
{
  int (*p)[MAXCOL];
  int bytes = MAXROW * (sizeof(*p));
  p = (int (*)[MAXCOL]) malloc(bytes);
  printf("malloc called for %d bytes\n", bytes);
}

On a 32 bit linux system:

gcc test.c
./a.out
malloc called for 48 bytes

(edited to remove pasting accident of multiplying by maxrow twice, yielding mistaken size of 144 bytes)

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I'm suprised GCC didn't complain about it not being int main(). –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '10 at 6:42
1  
The problem with that approach is that it doesn't distinguish the implementation specific result you get on a particular platform from what the language standard requires all implementations to do (12*sizeof int). And if you're relying solely on an empirical test, not reasoning about it in terms of what the language requirements are, you may not notice that you've multiplied by MAXROW twice and ended up with the wrong answer. –  David Gelhar Dec 9 '10 at 6:50
    
It's far easier to find typos in code than failed assumptions about what the language standards are. I am well aware of what the sizes of data types are on my system, and essentially pointed that out. I was not initially sure if the base size was that of an int or a pointer (as both are the same size), so momentarily changed the type to a short to see what would happen. Empirical experiments turn out to be a pretty good way to test assumptions. –  Chris Stratton Dec 9 '10 at 7:03
1  
When I was a little younger I would have attempted this question in an interview/test. Nowadays I would tell the aggressive smart-ass interviewer to shove it. There are far more important things to find out in an interview. –  Ciaran Keating Dec 9 '10 at 8:25

Running the following in codepad.org:

//#include<alloc.h>
#define MAXROW 3
#define MAXCOL 4

int main()
{
    int (*p)[MAXCOL];
    p = (int (*)[MAXCOL]) malloc(MAXROW*(sizeof(*p)));

    int x = MAXROW*(sizeof(*p));
    printf("%d", x);

    return 0;
}

prints out 48.

Why? Because MAXROW is 3, and sizeof(*p) is 16, so we get 3 * 16.

Why is sizeof(*p) 16? Because MAXCOL is 4, so p is a pointer to an array of 4 ints. Each int is 32 bits = 4 bytes. 4 ints in the array * 4 bytes = 16.

Why is sizeof(*p) not 4? Because it is the size of what p points to, not the size of p. To be the size of p it would have to be sizeof(p), which would be 4, as p is a pointer.

Pedantically you could add:

  1. If the machine is 64 bit (say) the answer would be 96.
  2. As the question states "How many bytes are allocated in the process?", you need to add the 4 bytes for the pointer p.
  3. malloc can allocate more than you ask for (but not less) so the question cannot be answered.
  4. In a similar vein as 2, you could argue that as the process is also loading system dlls such as the C runtime dll in order to run, it is allocating the space for those too. Then you could argue for the space allocated by dlls that are being injected into the process by other (non system) processes, such as those injected by Actual Window Manager and its ilk. But how pedantic do we want to get?

But I think the question is really asking for 48, with possible extra credit for explaining 96.

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Some compilers make int 32 bits wide even on 64 bit architectures. –  JeremyP Dec 9 '10 at 9:15
    
Comile the code on a C64 and the int will be 8 bits wide. Pedantically speaking... –  ThatGirl Dec 9 '10 at 12:38

How about zero bytes because that won't even compile without the non-standard alloc.h. If you can't compile it, you can't run it and if you can't run it, it can't allocate any memory at all.

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@mu: Nothing says alloc.h isn't somewhere else accessible to the compiler just because it's a nonstandard header. I certainly use boost headers all the time that aren't standard and my programs compile just fine. I'm sure there are plenty of people here who use POSIX headers too which aren't in the standard and they also work just fine. –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '10 at 6:44
    
@Billy: And nothing says we're not trying to compile this on a system were int is two bytes either. Nor is it specified that there isn't a -Dmalloc=printf on the command line. But now we're both picking nits, next we'll be arguing about how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. –  mu is too short Dec 9 '10 at 7:11
    
@mu: I don't understand what int being two bytes has to do with what I said. Complaining about a missing header doesn't belong in an answer even if it was provably true. –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '10 at 7:28
    
@Billy: The real point is that the (interview) question is rather poorly formed and the person that came up with it should slapped upside the head. They were trying to be all clever and tricky with syntax and neglected to have a proper main() and proper includes. As Nigel Tufnel said: there's a fine line between clever and stupid, this interview question has crossed that line. –  mu is too short Dec 9 '10 at 7:37
1  
@mu: It's the drums I won't touch... not in that band. –  Tony D Dec 9 '10 at 8:54

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