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From My technical interests. I'd like to how to work Facebook 'Like' button?

are there any security risk?

for example:

-Someone push my like button.

--if I 'm stolen my cookies If there is a blog that detailed explanation Could I have the URL?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is always a security risk involved in letting in Javascript from other domains (from the viewpoint of the user and third-party site provider), although that risk is somewhat minized if you serve your button inside an <iframe> on a separate API-like subdomain. That prevents parent Javascript code access to the contents of the frame and vice-versa. Basically, from the inside of the <iframe> you can only access the URL property of the parent page (and some other minor parameters).

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Thank you for replying . but is it not https ? if my cookies are stolen someone can put my like button? or Does FB have any protection? –  freddiefujiwara Dec 10 '10 at 0:57
    
Cookies can be read inside the browser only if the Javascript originated from the same domain (same-domain security policy, the same reason you can't do cross-domain AJAX), so no, other people can't read your cookies if the code comes from another domain. Also, anyone can read your cookies if you're using unencrypted wifi without SSL – see Firesheep. –  Krof Drakula Dec 10 '10 at 7:24
    
OK I got it! summarize the circumstance non ssl with facebook like button has risk that read and write someone my like request , thank you so much –  freddiefujiwara Dec 10 '10 at 9:00
1  
Just to clarify: using Facebook's like button by including it via http:// and not https:// will present a risk for users on public wifi. –  Krof Drakula Dec 10 '10 at 9:18

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