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If I have a @Transactional -annotation on a private method in a Spring bean, does the annotation have any effect?

If the @Transactional annotation is on a public method, it works and open a transaction.

public class Bean {
  public void doStuff() {
     doPrivateStuff();
  }
  @Transactional
  private void doPrivateStuff() {

  }
}

...

Bean bean = (Bean)appContext.getBean("bean");
bean.doStuff();
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5 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The answer your question is no - @Transactional will have no effect if used to annotate private methods. The proxy generator will ignore them.

This is documented in Spring Manual chapter 10.5.6:

Method visibility and @Transactional

When using proxies, you should apply the @Transactional annotation only to methods with public visibility. If you do annotate protected, private or package-visible methods with the @Transactional annotation, no error is raised, but the annotated method does not exhibit the configured transactional settings. Consider the use of AspectJ (see below) if you need to annotate non-public methods.

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Are you sure about this? I would not expect it to make a difference. –  willcodejavaforfood Dec 9 '10 at 8:47
7  
It will work with mode="aspectj" though. –  waxwing Dec 9 '10 at 8:47
    
@willcodejavaforfood: See citation –  skaffman Dec 9 '10 at 8:48
    
Thanks –  willcodejavaforfood Dec 9 '10 at 8:52
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The Question is not private or public, the question is: how is it invoked and which AOP implementation you use!

If you uses (default) Spring Proxy AOP then all AOP functionality provied by Spring (like @Transational) will only be taken in account if the call goes trough the proxy. -- This is normaly the case if the annotated method is invoked from an other bean.

This has two implications:

  • because private methods most not be invoked from an other bean (the exception is reflection), their @Transactional Annotation is not taken in accout
  • even if the method is public, but it is invoked from the same been, it will not taken in account either (this statement is only correct if (default) Spring Proxy AOP is used).

@See Spring Reference: Chapter 9.6 9.6 Proxying mechanisms

IMHO you should use the aspectJ mode, instead of the Spring Proxies, that will overcome the problem. And the AspectJ Transactional Aspects are woven even into private methods (checked for Spring 3.0).

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nice (+1) but I had to edit some spelling and grammar –  Sean Patrick Floyd Dec 9 '10 at 9:41
    
Both points are not necessarily true. The first is incorrect - private methods can be invoked reflectively, but the proxy discovering logic chooses not to do so. The second point is only true for interface-based JDK proxies, but not for CGLIB subclass-based proxies. –  skaffman Dec 9 '10 at 9:58
    
@skaffman: 1 - i make my statment more precise, 2. But the default Proxy is the Interface based - isn't it? –  Ralph Dec 9 '10 at 10:05
    
That depends whether the target uses interfaces or not. If it doesn't, CGLIB is used. –  skaffman Dec 9 '10 at 10:35
    
canu tell me the reson or some reference why cglib can not but aspectj can ? –  phil Feb 28 at 8:50
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By default the @Transactional attribute works only when calling an annotated method on a reference obtained from applicationContext.

public class Bean {
  public void doStuff() {
    doTransactionStuff();
  }
  @Transactional
  public void doTransactionStuff() {

  }
}

This will open a transaction:

Bean bean = (Bean)appContext.getBean("bean");
bean.doTransactionStuff();

This will not:

Bean bean = (Bean)appContext.getBean("bean");
bean.doStuff();

Spring Reference: Using @Transactional

Note: In proxy mode (which is the default), only 'external' method calls coming in through the proxy will be intercepted. This means that 'self-invocation', i.e. a method within the target object calling some other method of the target object, won't lead to an actual transaction at runtime even if the invoked method is marked with @Transactional!

Consider the use of AspectJ mode (see below) if you expect self-invocations to be wrapped with transactions as well. In this case, there won't be a proxy in the first place; instead, the target class will be 'weaved' (i.e. its byte code will be modified) in order to turn @Transactional into runtime behavior on any kind of method.

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Do you mean bean = new Bean();? –  willcodejavaforfood Dec 9 '10 at 9:02
    
Nope. If I create beans with new Bean(), the annotation will never work at least without using Aspect-J. –  Juha Syrjälä Dec 9 '10 at 9:06
    
replaced 2.5 reference link with current version –  Sean Patrick Floyd Dec 9 '10 at 9:45
    
thanks! This explains weird behaviour I was observing. Quite counter intuitive this internal method invocation restriction... –  manuel aldana Jul 7 '11 at 14:18
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Plese see this doc :

In proxy mode (which is the default), only external method calls coming in through the proxy are intercepted. This means that self-invocation, in effect, a method within the target object calling another method of the target object, will not lead to an actual transaction at runtime even if the invoked method is marked with @Transactional.

Consider the use of AspectJ mode (see mode attribute in table below) if you expect self-invocations to be wrapped with transactions as well. In this case, there will not be a proxy in the first place; instead, the target class will be weaved (that is, its byte code will be modified) in order to turn @Transactional into runtime behavior on any kind of method.

----------------------------over

so, anther way is user BeanSelfAware

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The answer is no. Please see Spring Reference: Using @Transactional :

The @Transactional annotation may be placed before an interface definition, a method on an interface, a class definition, or a public method on a class

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replaced 2.5 reference link with current version –  Sean Patrick Floyd Dec 9 '10 at 9:46
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